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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/generalcataloga8990iowa 



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State Abhigulturbl College 



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IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OF 



AGRICULTURE + MECHANIC ARTS, 



H 



1889, 



" SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE, 



1889. 

BY THE COLLEGE. 

AMES. 



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1889. 


1890. 1 


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CALENDAR FOR 1889. 



Term opened - 

Entrance Examinations - - - 

Recitations began - 

Centennial of the Constitution - 

Decoration Day 

Term Examinations - 

Junior Exhibition - 

Second Term began - 

Entrance Examinations 

Recitations began 

Term Examinations - - 

Baccalaureate Sermon - 

Address before Trustees - 

Commencement Exercises 

Winter Vacation from November 13, 1889, to 



Wednesday, February 27. 

\ Wednesday, February 27. 
I Thursday, February 28. 

Friday. March 1. 

Tuesday, April 30. 

Thursday, May 30. 

June 13 to 19. 

Wednesday. June 19. 

Wednesday. June 17. 

{ Wednesday. July 17. 
"j Thursday, July 18. 

Friday, Jul} 19. 

November 6 to 13 . 

Sunday, November 10. 

Tuesday evening, Nov. 12. 

Wednesday, November 13 

February 25, 1890. 



CALENDAR FOR 1890. 



First Term opens - 

Entrance Examinations - 

Recitations begin 

Decoration Day - 

Term Examinations 

Junior Exhibition - 

Field Sports and Competitive Military Drill 

Second Term begins - 

Entrance Examinations - - 

Recitations begin - 

Term Examinations - 

Baccalaureate Sermon - 

Address before Trustees 

Commencement Exercises - 

Winter Vacation from November 12, 1890, to 



Tuesday, February 25. 

Tuesday, February 25. 
Wednesday, February 26. 

Thursday, February 27. 

Friday, May 30. 

June 11 to 18. 

Wednesday, June 18. 

Wednesday, June 18. 

Tuesday, July 15. 

Tuesday, July 15. 
Wednesday, July 16. 

Thursday, July 17. 

November 5 to 12. 

Sunday, November 9. 

Tuesday evening, Nov. 11. 

Wednesday, November 12. 

February 24, 1891. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



First District — Hon. J. W. Garner, Columbus City, 
Second District — Hon. C. M. Dunbar, Maquoketa, 
Third District— Hon. G. W. Dunham, Manchester, 
Fourth District — Hon. S. P. Yeomans, Charles City 
Fifth District — Hon. Joseph Dysart, Dysart, 
Sixth District — lion. John Morrison, Hedrick, 
Seventh District — Hon. J. S. Clarkson, Des Moines, 
Eighth District- Hon. Ceo. Van Houten, Lenox, 
Ninth District — Hon. Piatt Wicks, Harlan, 
Tenth District — Hon. Eugene Secor, Forest City, 
Eleventh District Hon. C. D. Boardman, Odebolt. 



Term Expires. 

1892 

1892 
1890 
1892 
1894 
1890 
1894 
1892 
189 
1894 
1894 



OFFICE i(S OF THE HOARD. 



I Ion. Joseph Dysart, Dysart, 

K. W. Stanton, Ames. 

Herman Knapp, Ames. 
.1. R. Lincoln, Ames. 



Chairman. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Steivard. 



MEETINGS. 

1 '"' ;i ;|1 meeting of the Board of Trustees is held on the second 

Wedm da oi November; also a second meeting In May, and others if 

on i< i i ii 1 1 1 



STANDING COMMITTEES OE THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Executive and Finance Committee — Trustees Wicks, Yeomans, Dunham, 
Secor and Van Houten. 

Committee on Faculty and Courses of Study — Trustees Clarkson, Morrison, 
Dunbar, Boardman and Dysart. 

Committee on Farm and Farm Buildings — Trustees Secor, Boardman and 
Dunbar. 

Cmnmittee on Horticulture, Experiments and Hybridizing — Trustees Van 
Ilouten. Yeomans and Boardman. 

Committee on Workshop — Trustees Dunbar, Clarkson, Dunham and Morrison. 

Committee on College Lands — Trustees Morrison, Boardman and Secor. 

Building Committee — Trustees Garner, Dunham and Van Ilouten. 

Committee on Investments — Trustees Yeomans, Dunham and Secor. 

Committee on Library— Trustees Clarkson, Van Ilouten and Dysart. 

Committee on Rules — Trustees Dunbar, Morrison and Secor. 

Committee on Bonds — Trustees Dunham and Wicks. 

Committee on Domestic Economy — Trustees Boardman. Yeomans and Mor- 
rison. 

Committee on Experiment Station — Trustees Garner, Dunbar and Dysart. 

Committee on Scientific Departments — Trustees Clarkson, Yeomans and 
Boardman. 



WW A STATE COLLEGE OF 



Vx\ 2i. §♦ UTclcl? 



Dr. A. S. Welch, first President of the Iowa Agricultural College, died at 
Pasadena. California, March 14. 1889. He was born in East Hampton, Con- 
necticut, April 12, 1821. At the age of eighteen yea?s he emigrated to 
Michigan, and prepared himself to enter the University of that State at the 
Academy at Romeo. He was admitted to the University in 1843, and graduated 
in 1846. During the last two years of his course he had charge of the Prep- 
aratory Department of the University, where by successful work he laid the 
foundation of his great reputation as a teacher. In 1847 he was elected prin- 
cipal of the school at Jonesville — the first union o v graded school established 
in Michigan. So marked was his success in the conduct of this school, and 
bo strongly did he impress himself upon the public school system of the 
State, that in L851 lie was offered and accepted the principabhip of the State 
Normal School at Yysilanti. Mich. He remained at the head of this institu- 
tion for fifteen years. In the management of its affairs he displayed an 
executive power and an ability as an instructor and disciplinarian which 
p laced him in the first rank of educators. He rendered services of the high- 
esl value in the general upbuilding of the educational syst* m of Michigan, 
Be conducted teachers' institutes and lectured on education in all parts of the 
state : he organized the state Teachers' Association, serving as its first presi- 
dent, and being for many years prominent in its management. As trustee of 
the Michigan Agricultural College., he became greatly interested in industrial 
education. Iah\ ingthe Normal School in L865, because of impaired health, he 
removed to Floriaa, seeking rest and renewed strength in a change of climate. 
He was elected to the United states Senate from that Slate in 1867. In the 
mil' year he terminated his Senatorial career in order to accept the Pres- 
idency "I the Iowa Agricultural College The charter and seal of the insti- 
tution were formally delivered into his hands Maich 17. 1869, but he had 
already outlined ;i course of study and prepared a plan of organization which 
bad been submitted to and approved by the Board of Trustees. Able, faith- 
ful, vigilant, be proved himself thoroughly competent to guide the institution 
through I he difficulties and viccissitudes of its early years. His cul- 
tured taste projected Its beautiful grounds; his executive ability organized 
partments, and his far-seeing wisdom planned its courses of study. The 
fifteen years of his presidency saw the College advanced to the front rank of 
Industrial institutions Resigning the presidency in 1884, he was in the fol- 
lowing year elected Professor of Psychology and History of Civilization, 
which position he continued to hold with pleasure to himself and great profit 
to the institution until his death. 
in Welch received from the Universitj of Iowa in L873 the degree of 
and in 1878 the Qniversitj of Michigan conferred upon him 
'in-- high honor He was the author of several educational works. 
I which are Kn Analysis of the English Sentence," " A Treatise Upon 
mi Psychology," and "Psychology for Teachers." 
Di "■ • cl was a born executive, a ripe scholar, a natural educator. His wed! 
and pnerous, kindlj disposition won the respect and con- 
ociat< and the Jove and reverence of his students. For the 
■ 'hi in the upbuilding of this Institution, his name 
•mi and lasting remembrance, in affectionate apprecia- 
rl thl memorial page is, by the vote of the Faculty, dedicated 



Aonrcri/rmi-: and mechanic arts. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION. 



W. I. CHAMBERLAIN, A. M., LL. D., President, 
Professor of Psychology, Ethics and Civics. 

A. S. WELCH, A. M., LL. D.,* 

Professor of Psychology and History of Civilization. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Professor of Veterinary Science. 

J. L. BUDD, M. H., 

Professor of Horticulture. 

E. W. STANTON, M. Sc, 
Professor of Mathematics and Political Economy. 

D. S. FAIRCHILD, M. D., 
Professor of Pathology, Histology, Therapeutics and Comparative Anatomy. 

C. F. MOUNT, C. E., 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

CAPT. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 

ALFRED A. BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

HERBERT OSBORN, M. Sc, 

Professor of Zoology and Entomology. 

J. C. HAINER, B. Sc. M. D., 
Professor of Physics. 

A. C. BARROWS, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of English Literature and History. 

LOREN P. SMITH, M. Sc, 
Professor of Agriculture and Farm Superintendent. 

MLSS LILLIE M. GUNN, 
Preceptress and Professor of French and German. 

C. W. SCRIBNER, A. B., M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

L. H. PAMMEL. B. Agr., 

Professor of Botany. 



'Deceased March 13, 1889. 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 

MRS. ELIZA OWENS, 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

MISS CORA MARSLAND, O. B., 
Librarian and Instructor in Elocution. 

MISS EVA F. PIKE, 
Organist and Instructor in Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

A. J. WEICHARDT, M. E.. 
Foreman and Instructor in Machine Shops. 

E. A. KIRKPATRICK, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English Composition, Rhetoric and Mathematics. 

L. F. KEBLER, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

JOHN McBIRNEY, 

Acting- House Surgeon. 

F. A. WEI BE, M. E., 

Assistant in Drawing. 



NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

V. E. CRUTTENDEN, M. D., 
Ophthalmology. 

LOUId SCHOOLER, M. I)., 
Surgical Therapeutics. 



MiRICVLTVRE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 1L 



OFFICERS OF THE EXPERIMENT STATION. 



HON. J. W. GARNER, HON. JOSEPH DYSART, 

HON. C. M. DUNBAR, 

Committee of the College Board of Trustees on Experiment Station. 



R. P. Speer, Director. 

Herman Kxapp, Treasurer. 

G. E. Patrick, M. Sc, Chemist. 

C. P. Gillette. M. Sc, Entomologist. 

Alfred A. Bennett, M. Sc., Chemist (Special Work). 

L. It. Pammel, B. Agr., Botanist (Special Work). 

J. L. Bri)D. M. H., Horticulture (Special Work). 

Lorkn P. Smith, M. Sc, Agriculture (Special Work). 

M. Stalker, M. Sc, Veterinary Science (Special Work). 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



LIST OF STUDENTS, i 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



NAME. DEGREE, 

Kirkpatrick, Edwin A.. B. Sc., M. Ph.. 
Malley, Frederick W., B. s c .. M. Sc, 



POST OFFICE. COUNTY. 

Ames, Story. 

Des Moines, Polk. 

— Resident Graduates 2. 





SENIORS. 




\ \MK. 


COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


Baker, James \., 


*G., 


Rhodes, 


Marshall. 


Banks, .1. Edwin, 


fC. E., 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Be> er, Samuel W., 


G., 


Manly, 


Worth. 


Bisbee, Derward B., 


G, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Budrow, William 1>.. 


G. 


Ogden, 


Boone. 


< lhamberlain, Herbert W. 


g. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cooley, Prank II.. 


G E., 


Truro, 


Madison. 


Day, Harrj B., 


|M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


I mrkee, Joseph E., 


G, 


Floyd, 


Floyd. 


Gossard, Harry A.. 


G, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Graham, \. Louis, 


M. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


1 Ireen, Burtis T.. 


G., 


Little Rock, 


Lyon. 


Hensen, William R., 


G, 


Denison, 


Crawford. 


Johnson, Nellie, 


Ill- 


Alton, 


Sioux. 


Kelsej . James a.. 


G, 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Kimball, Clemenl I-'.. 


M. E., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Lamboi n. < barleq W., 


c. i:., 


Elliott, 


Montgomery 


M<< lelland, Albert, 


G. 


North Des Moines 


, Polk. 


McLaughlin, Angus \.. 


g. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


McPherson, Albert, 


G. 


( )el wcin. 


Faj ette. 


tier, John \.. 


<;.. 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Seward, 


G., 


Brooks, 


Adams. 


i. Belle, 


1. . 


Wood ward. 


Dallas. 


i ra \.. 


G. 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


: '•'. nil 1 '.. 


g i;.. 


l lumboldt, 


Humboldt. 


■ 


<,., 


Le Gain-, 


Scott. 


»er, John, 

i i . 


M. E., 
G 


Grant, 

Mater. 


Montgomery, 

Story. 


roi '.' ii- i ;.l 

' I i Civil E 
n Mecbi 


< Mm . in Scienc< 
iiiicni Eng Ineerlnj 


• iimi ajjth-iiIi ure. 





AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



L3 



\ WIK. 


COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY, 


Shelton, John A., 


G., 


Abingdon, 


Jefferson. 


Shoemaker, William R.. 


G., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Snyder. Virgil, 
Starr. Palmer W., 


C. E., 


Dixon, 
Carson, 


Scott. 
Pottawatamie. 


Stearns Charles H., 


G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stroud, John S., 


G., 


Linden, 


Dallas. 


Thornburg. Matthew W., 


G., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Thurlimann, Rosalia L., 


L., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wade. Charles M., 


G., 


Stan wood, 


Cedar. 


Zimbelman, Mary C, 


L., 


Boone, 


Boone. 
— Seniors 38. 



VETERINARY. 



Ashworth, Charles A., 
Bousquet. Abraham E. D , 
Geddes. T. Alexander, 
McBirney, John, 
Nelson, Sofus B., 
Piatt. John H., 

Reynolds, Myron H., B. S. A., 
Simcoke, Joseph O., 



Ashawa, 

Pella, 

Ames, 

Conrad, 

Avoca, 

Montezuma, 

Shellsburg, 

Stuart 



Polk. 

Marion. 

Story. 

Grundy. 

Pottawatamie. 

Poweshiek. 

Benton. 

Adair. 



-Senior Veterinary Students 8. 
— Total Seniors 4(3. 





JUNIORS. 




Bannister, Nettie, 


L., 


Cherokee. 


Cherokee. 


Bolles, William E., 


C. E., 


Ridgeway, 


Winneshiek, 


Bond, George P., 


G.. 


Lehigh, 


Webster. 


Bramhall. John A., 


M. E., 


Cai lisle, 


Warren. 


Brandvig, Meyer, 


G., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Buell, Hardy ().. 


G., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Carter, Donald M., 


M. E. 


Orange City, 


Sioux. 


Chamberlain. Joseph S., 


G-, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Crosby, Herbert E., 


G., 


Floyd, 


Floyd. 


Davidson, Frank E., 


C. E., 


Batavia, 


Jefferson. 


Davidson, Charles I)., 


M. E. 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Dewell, William C, 


G., 


Magnolia, 


Harrison. 


Eaton, Edward N., 


G., 


Keota, 


Keokuk. 


Eustis, George D., 


M. E., 


Aplington, 


Butler, 


Fellows, Mary E , 


L., 


Montour, 


Tama. 


Georgen, John. 


G., 


Rockville, 


Delaware. 



14 



TOW A STATE COLLEGE OF 



N LME. 


COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


Graham, J. Melville, 


<;.. 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


Hardy, May. 


L., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Haven, Spencer. 


G., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


I lonely. Eugene, 


G., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Howard. T. Sigel, 


G.. 


East Des Moines, 


Polk 


Howell. Sylvester S., 


M. E., 


Iowa City. 


Johnson. 


Kerr, Thomas S., 


G., 


Cincinnati, 


Appanoose. 


Kreger, Edward A., 


G., 


Keota, 


Keokuk. 


Mann. Alice. 


G., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Mann, Bertha, 


G., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


McCuskey, Henry B., 


C. E., 


Defiance, 


Shelby. 


Mills. Ada. 


L., 


Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Olmsted, Roberl W., 


G., 


Milan, 


Illinois. 


Perry. .Joseph M.. 


M. E., 


Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Quint, Violet l\. 


L., 


Carroll, 


Carroll, 


Roberts, Minnie. 


L., 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Sehulte, George Henry, 


G., 


Clayton, 


Clayton. 


Shan!. William 11.. 


G., 


Millersburg, 


Iowa. 


S'ni inc. I-'. At wood. 


Ag., 


Dysart, 


Tama. 


Smith. C Tennc\ . 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stevens, Kate. 


L., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Stinson, John T., 


(i.. 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Thurlimann, Edward, 


a, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Thurlimann, Leo.. 


G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


. M.itic 


C. E., 


Wood bine, 


Harrison. 
— Juniors 41. 



VETERINARY. 



Knowles, Clifton B., 
McLaughlin. James J. 
Williams, \ !'..-i t R„ 



.James Station, Plymouth. 
Webster < 1 ity, Hamilton. 

Clenwood, Mills. 

— Junior Veterinary Students 3. 
—Total Juniors 44. 



SOPHOMORES. 



8., 

ihi ah t 

i . Kn 



C. E. 


Burt, 


Kossuth 


c. E., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


G,, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


L., 


Ames, 


Story. 


C. E. 


Sheldon. 


O'Brien. 


'. 


Boone, 


Boone. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



15 



\ \MK. 


COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


Christy, George L., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Clarke, Clinton C. 


G., 


Potter, 


Tama. 


Colton. Pied M., 


G., 


Columbus City, 


Louisa. 


Cottrell, Carrie L. 


L., 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 


Cottrell, May. 


L-, 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 


Dean. Harry A.. 


C. E., 


Arcadia, 


Carroll. 


DeCou, Frank 11.. 


G., 


Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Dow. W. Newton, 


M. E., 


College Springs, 


Page. 


Dyer. Robert M.. 


M. E., 


Pleasant Valley, 


Scott. 


Finerson, Loyd L.. 


G„ 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Fairchild. David S. . 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Finn. Charles F., 


M. E., 


Radclitfe, 


Hardin. 


Gilchrist, Annie L., 


L., 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 


Heileuian, William H., 


G., 


Elwell, 


Story. 


Hinds. Rollin E., 


C. E., 


Ottumwa, 


AVapello. 


Howe, Frank I)., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hudson. Edwin P., 


G., 


Sheffield, 


Franklin. 


Hutton. Thomas P., 


G., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Jackson, William EL, 


C. E., 


Waukee, 


Dallas. 


Jaquiss, Daisy, 


L., 


Cincinnati, 


Appanoose. 


Johnson. Charles W., 


G., 


Ontario. 


Story. 


Jones, Clyde, 


M. E., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Jones, Edwin D., 


C. E., 


Sharpsburg, 


Taylor. 


King, Edwin s.. 


G., 


Fifteen Mile, 


Tama. 


King, Nellie, 


L., 


Fifteen Mile, 


Tama. 


Lovejoy, Alva B. 


G., 


Rock Creek, 


Mitchell. 


McNaughton, Louis D., 


M. E., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Meek. William H., 


G., 


Polk City. 


Polk. 


Mills, Ella, 


L., 


Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Moore, John H., 


C. E., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Morrison, John, 


C. E., 


Hearick, 


Keokuk. 


Moss, Berkley X., 


C. E., 


Brownville, 


Mitchell. 


Nichols, Mary A., 


L., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Ockerson, C. Linneus, 


C E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery, 


Oggel, E. Christian, 


G., 


Orange City, 


Sioux. 


Porter, Edward II , 


G., 


Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Reynolds. Norton B., 


C. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Richman, May S., 


L., 


Muscatine, 


Mm-catine. 


Rickard. Hugh B., 


C. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Rickey, Millard L., 


G., 


Wellman, 


Washington. 


Roddis, May, 


L. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Schulte. J. Fred, 


G., 


Clayton, 


Clayton. 


Shaum, Benjamin F., 


C. E., 


Columbus City, 


Louisa. 


Shepperd, John H., 


G., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



Smith, A. J., 
Spaan, John. 
Steele, Walter 1).. 
Swift, Willis C, 
Thornburg, 1). A.. 
Woods. Charles M. 



Allen. Herbert. 
Andruss, Clifford .1.. 
Barrows, Charlotte l>. 
Beach, Edwin I... 
Benjaman, Reuben I!. 
Blaine, Estella, 
Blanchard, Lelia, 
Bonwell, Albert N.. 
Bowman, Edith C, 
Boyd, Emma II.. 

Boj er, Howard .1., 

Brooks, George S., 
Brown, '.. Eugene, 
' ampbell, Zenas M.. 
Clinton, Ellsworth E., 

Edgar ('.. 
' ulver, ' . t-i m- \ \e\ e R., 
Dalle), Elan la, 

d • mi s.. 

\ nnie, 
1 harlea C, 
Duncan, Ruth, 

I trence, 
>: I 
Kurd, 

S., 
tie i; . 
i arence 8., 

i' 

■ ' niidt. \doljdi. 
I ( 
■ l. I i .till. .1. . 

I I;. 



COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


G., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


G., 


Orange City, 


Sioux. 


M. E., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


M. E., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


G., 


Orchard, 


Mitchell. 


G., 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 
— Sophomores 56, 


FRESHMEN. 




G., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


G., 


Dallas, 


Texas. 


L., 


A.mes, 


Story. 


M. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


M. E , 


Clark, 


Dakota. 


L., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


L., 


Russell, 


Lucas. 


G., 


Clarksville, 


Butler 


L.. 


Earlviile, 


Delaware. 


L., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


<;., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


G., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


<;., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


C. E., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


C. E., 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


<;.. 


Auburn. 


Sac. 


i... 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


i-.. 


Ames, 


Story. 


<;.. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


L., 


E. Dos Moines, 


Polk. 


M. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


1-.. 


Ames, 


Story . 


<;.. 


Brighton, 


Washington. 


<; . 


Milo, 


Warren. 


I-., 


Woodbine. 


Harrison. 


C. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


1-.. 


Ontario, 


Story. 


<;., 


i independence, 


Buchanan. 


<,.. 


Ames. 


Story. 


<-.. 


LeClaire, 


Scott. 


c. 


Whitten, 


Grundy. 


<;.. 


Stratford, 


I tamilton. 


L 


Aurora, 


Nebraska. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



17 



\ W1K. 


COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


Henry, Eugene B., 


C. 


E., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Hicks. William C, 


G. 




Brighton, 


Washington. 


Hollenbeck. Benjamin F. 


M. 


E., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Hollenbeck, Louis C, 


M. 


E., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Hudson. Jessie, 


L. 




Coldwater, 


Franklin. 


-Jones. James V . 


G. 




Ontario, 


Story. 


Kaufman, Elmer E., 


G., 


i 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Kelley, Leonard G., 


M 


, E., 


Deep River, 


Poweshiek. 


Knapp, s. Arthur, 


G. 




Ames, 


Story- 


Knight. Warren M.. 


G. 


» 


Monroe, 


Jasper. 


Lawson, Hugh, 


G. 




Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Mally, Charles W., 


G. 




Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Maxwell. Jessie, 


L. 


i 


Ames, 


Story. 


McCullocb, Jesse II.. 


G. 




Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


McPherson, Robert. 


M. 


E., 


Oelwein, 


Fayette. 


Meredith. F. II.. 


G„ 




Ames, 


Story. 


Meyerhoff, J). H., 


G. 




E. Nodaway, 


Adams. 


Mil burn. Warren P., 


M. 


E., 


Kansas City, 


Missouri. 


Mi nehen. John P., 


G. 


? 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Morrison. Jennie, 


L.. 




Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Muhs. Fred R., 


C. 


E., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Nettleton, Guy E., 


C. 


E. 


Sheffield, 


Franklin. 


Nichols. Lydia A., 


L. 


» 


Ames, 


Story. 


O'Neal, Melville E., 


G.. 


i 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Perley, C. Bert, 


M. 


E., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Phelps, Fred S., 


M. 


E.. 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Porter. Georgia, 


L., 




Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Porter. Kate M.. 


L., 




Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Quivey, L. Aithur, 


G. 


> 


New Hampton, 


Chickasaw. 


Raymond. Hud H., 


G. 




Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Rolfs. J Jin A.. 


G. 


> 


LeClaire, 


Scott, 


Ru fledge, Thomas T., 


G-, 




Sharps, 


Taylor. 


Sanders, Edwin S., 


C. 


E., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Seydel, Charles F., 


G. 




Harper, 


KeoKuk. 


Shepard, Edward A. 


G. 




Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Sloan, Robert J.. 


G. 




Platteville, 


Taylor. 


Smith. Cora E., 


L., 




Marshal ltown, 


Marshall. 


Spinney, Louis B., 


M. 


E., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Stearns, Mattie L., 


L., 




S. Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Stevens, Thomas W., 


G.. 




Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Stewart. Fred G, 


G.. 




Greenfield, 


Adair. 


Stokes. Arthur ('.. 


G.. 




Rock Rapids, 


Lyon. 


Swanson, C. Frederick, 


g. 




Madrid, 


Boone. 


Taylor. George M., 


g. 


i 


Polk City, 


Polk. 



18 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



v \ M K. 

Thornburg, -Jennie. 
Trotter, Walter F., 
Vail. Edward M., 
Van Bouten, Ozro, 
Vernon, John J., 
Walton. Charles A., 
Weingartner, Edwin C. 
Welsh, George H.. 
White. Clark. 
Williams Worthin 11.. 
Wilson, Elmina, 
Zmunt, Wincent, 



COURSE. 


POST OFFICE. 


COUNTY. 


L., 


Pan or a, 


Guthrie. 


M. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


C. 


Marshaltown, 


Marshall. 


G., 


Lenox, 


Taylor. 


G., 


Bangor, 


Marshall. 


C. E., 


Burlington, 


Des Moines. 


G., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


M. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


G., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


M. E., 


Chester Center, 


Poweshiek. 


L, 


Harper, 


Keokuk. 


G., 


Mitchell, 


Mitchell. 






— Freshmen 



VETERINARY. 



\rne\ . ( iarney, 
Aastin, \\ _ i J 1 i n 1 1 1 11.. 
Beck, William A.. 
Knight, Barry G., 
Manchester, Edward L., 
McClanahan, William A., 
M''( lord, Elias s -. 
Russell, Charles M.. 
Sorenson, wis., 
Starkey, tiranl !■'.. 
Whitbeck, Samuel S., 
Wilson. Peter M.. 



Manning, 

Mil ford, 

Irwin, 

Sac City, 

Dunlap, 

Mt. Ayr, 

Nevada, 

West Side, 

Sr. Ansgar, 

Ames, 

New Hampton, 

Traer, 



Carroll. 

Dickinson. 

Shelby. 

Sac. 

Harrison. 

Ringgold. 

Story. 

Crawford. 

Mitchell. 

Story. 

Chickasaw. 

Tama. 



-Freshmen Veterinary Students 12. 
—Total Freshmen 101. 



ii.. 
Andrew Livonia, 

irgarette M., 

in- \.. 

pti N.. 

. Inezj 

Mhu m., 
. - . i 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

POST OFFICE. 

Monroe, 

\ lues, 

Lexington, 

Glidden, 

Earlville, 

Chariton, 

Vinton, 

Knoxville, 

Ellsworth, 



COUNTY. 

.Jasper. 

Story. 

Washington. 

Carroll. 

Delaware. 

Lucas. 

Benton. 

Marion. 

Hamilton. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



19 



\ \MK. 

Dean, Nellie E., 
Freeman. Alice M., 
Fuller, Q. C, 
Gaston, Belle L.. 
Gilbert, Ellis T., 
Hammer, Edward W., 
llobart. Mark C, 
Hollenbeck, Nellie, 
Johnson, John A., 
•Jones, William B., 
Jongewaard, Cornelius A. 
Kebler, Lyman F.. 
King, Charlotte M,, 
Manlig. Anton. 
McCue. Frank. Jr., 
Mills. Frank W., 
Norton, James C.. 
Phillips, H. S., 
Richard, J. II., 
Radnieh, Helen. 
Root. Lillian M., 
■Scott. Walter E., 
Smith. Josephine, 
Thompson. Lettie C, 
Van Velsor, H. J. Cora, 
Whitehead, Frank E., 



post OFFICE. 

East Des Moines, 

Ellsworth. 

Swan Lake, 

Marshalltown, 

Council Bluffs, 

Des Moines, 

Cherokee, 

Sheldon, 

Munterville. 

Slwpsburgh, 

Orange City, 

Ann Harbor, 

Des Moines, 

State Center, 

Ottumwa, 

Maxwell, 

Wilton Junction, 

Oskaloosa, 

Jewell, 

Davis City, 

Cincinnati, 

Eddyville, 

Des Moines, 

Agency, 

Renwick. 

Moingona, 



COUNTY. 

Polk. 
Hamilton. 
Emmet. 
Marshall. 
Pottawattamie. 
Polk. 
Cherokee. 
O'Brien. 
Wapello. 
Taylor. 
Sioux. 
Michigan. 
Polk. 
Marshall. 
Wapello. 
Story. 
Muscatine. 
Mahaska. 
Hamilton. 
Decatur. 
Appanoose. 
Wapello. 
Polk. 
Wapello. 
Humboldt. 
Boone. 
-Special Students 35. 



HONOR LIST. 



Commencement Speakers 1888, airanged in order of Scholarship. 
W. F. Warwick, B. M. E. A. E. Sheaf e, B. Sc. 

L. C. Tilden, B. Sc. Miss Julia Wentch, B. L. 

Nathaniel Spencer, B. Sc. Sherman Yates, B. Sc. 

F. L. Ainsworth. D. V. M. Clarence Baker, B. C. E. 

J. E. Gyde. B. Sc. J. G. Abraham, B. S. A. 

Junior Speakers, 1889, arranged in order of Scholarship. 
Leo Thnrlimann. J. S. Chamberlain. 

F. A Kreger. Miss May Hardy. 
Mis- Minnie Roberts. Miss Bertha Mann. 

G. II. Schulte. W. C. Dewell. 
Miss Kate Stevens. Spencer Haven. 



20 IOWA COLLEGE OF 



SUMMARY. 

Resident Graduates, - 2 

Seniors, - - - - - - -46 

Juniors, ------ 44 

Sophomores, - - - - - - 56 

Freshmen, ._.-__ 101 

Special Students. - - - - - - 35 

Total Enrollment, - 284 

Music Scholars not enrolled above, - - - - 13 

Music Scholars total, including those enrolled above. - 129 

Total number of Ladies in College Classes. ... - 82 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHASIC ARTS. 'Jl 



HISTORICAL 



In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to establish "A State Agri- 
cultural College and Model Farm." to be connected with the entire agricult- 
ural interests of the State ; appointed a board of commissioners to buy a farm 
and erect a college building, and elected a board of trustees to select a fac- 
ulty and organize a college. In 1859 a farm of six hundred and forty acres, 
situated near Ames, was purchased for the use of the college. This college 
and farm were entirely an agricultural institution. 

In 1862 a bill was passed by Congress, entitled, "An act donating public 
lands to the several States and Territories, which may provide colleges for the 
benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts." 

Section 1 of this bill says: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, that 
there be granted to the several States for the purpose hereinafter mentioned, 
an amount of public land, to be apportioned to each State in quantity equal 
to thirty thousand acres for each Senator and Representative in Congress to 
which the States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under the 
census of 1860: provided that no mineral lands shall be selected or pur- 
chased under the provisions of this act." 

Section 4 requires: "That all moneys derived from the sale of the lands 
aforesaid by the States to which the lands are apportioned, and from the sale 
of land scrip, hereinbefore provided for, shall be invested in stocks of the 
Tinted States, or some other safe stock, yielding not less than five per centum 
on the par value of said stocks ; and that the money so invested shall consti- 
tute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain forever undiminished 
(except as may be provided for in section fifth of this act), and the inteicst 
of which shall inviolably be appropriated by each State which may take and 
claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support and maintenance of 
at least one college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach 
-ii. h branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in >uch manner as the Legislatures of the States may provide, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the sev- 
eral pursuits and professions of life." 

Section 5 says: "And be it further enacted, that the grant of land and 
land scrip hereby authorized shall be made on the following conditions, to 
which, as well as to the provisions hereinbefore contained, the previous assent 
•of the several States shall be signified by Legislative acts : First, if any por- 
tion of the fund invested as provided by the foregoing section, or any portion 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



of the inteiest thereon, shall, by any action or contingency, be diminished or 
lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it belongs, so that the capital 
of the fund si all remain foiever undiminished : and the annual interest shall 
be regularlj applied wilhout diminution to the puiposes mentioned in the 
fourth section of this act. except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum 
upon the amount received by any State under the provisions of this act, may 
be expended for the purchase of lands for sites or experimental farms, 
wherever authorized by the respective Legislatures of said States. Second, 
do portion of said fund nor the interest thereon, shall be applied, directly or 
indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the puiciiase. erection, preserva- 
tion, or repair of any building or buildings.*' 

In 1872 the General Assembly accepted the giant upon the conditions and 
under the restricts ns contained in the act of Congress, and by so doing en- 
tered into a contract with the General Government to erect and keep in repair 
all buildings necessary for the use of the College. By this action of the 
General A.-s< mbJy ihe College was changed fiom a purely agricultural insti- 
tution into a College of Agiiculture and Mechanic Arts, with the broad and 
Liberal course of study outlined in the following paragraph. 

In L882 the General Assembly passed an act defining the course of study to 
be pursued, as follows : Section 1. That section 1621 of the Code is hereby 
repealed, and I he following is enacted in lieu thereof: Section 2621. That 
there -ball be adopted and taught at the State Agricultural College a broad, 
liberal and practical course of study, in which the leading branches of learn- 
ing -hall relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, and which shall also < m- 
brace Buch other branches of learning as will most practically and liberally 
educate Ihe agricultural and industrial classes in the several pursuits and pro- 
fessions ol life, Including military tactics. Section 2. That all acts and 
parts ol acta Inconsistent with this acl are hereby repealed. 

The income of the College (including the Congressional appropriations of 

115,000 per year lor Ihe Experimental Station) averages about $60,000 per 

000 of which is expended for salaries of professors, instruc- 

and roremen, and $15,000 to $20,000 for agricultural experimentation. 

The remaindei ia required for the necessary running expenses of the various 

departments and minor expenditures of the College, and for the purchase of 

chemical, physical and other apparatus. New buildings are erected and re- 

ire made from Bpecial Legislative appropriations for the purpose. 

1 •"• Colli formally opened on the 17th of March, 1869. In the 

the State Agricultural Experiment Station was established as 

1 department ol Ibe College, under the law of Congress known as the Hatch 

fttion id pa ed in 1887. This law provides for the estabb>h- 

1 each State thai accepts the conditions, and contem- 

ipproprlatlon bj Congress each year of $15,000 to each station so 
bed The appropriations have now been made for two years, and 
'i ol theii continuance. 



AQRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 23 



LOCATION. 



The College occupies a delightful and healthful location, ou high, rolling 
land, a mile and a half west of the town of Ames, which is at the junction or 
crossing of two lines of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, in the center 
county (Story) of the State, and thirty-seven miles north of the city of Des 
Moines. The railroad facilities for reaching Ames from every part of the 
State are excellent. Regular conveyances for passengers and baggage run 
between the railway station and the College three times each day, except 
Sundays. 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS. 

Twelve commodious buildings have been erected by the State for the exclu- 
sive use of the various departments of the College, besides the dwelling- 
houses and the buildings for farm stock, machinery and work. 

The main College Building is five stories high including the basement and 
is 158 feet long by 112 feet through the wings. In the basement (which is 
almost wholly above ground and is thoroughly lighted and well ventilated) 
are the dining-room, kitchen, room for help, and one Society room. On the 
first floor, proper, are the chapel, the library, reception rooms, recitation 
rooms, music rooms and the offices of some of the teachers and the steward. 
On the second floor are several recitation rooms and rooms for students and 
teachers. On the third and fourth floors are students' rooms and the zoo- 
logical and geological museums. About two hundred students can be accom- 
modated with rooms in this building. All the rooms are heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. Pure spring water is supplied in all the stories of the 
building. The water closets are brick towers separated from the main build- 
ing by a space of twelve feet each, connected only by open lattice bridges 
with the different stories. With the best modern system of plumbing, includ- 
ing automatic flushing, the sanitary condition of the dormitories is pronounced 
perfect. 

There are also two Boarding Cottages, brick buildings, affording rooms for 
eighty students : with dining-room, kitchen and store rooms. The cottages 
are supplied with pure spring water and lighted by electricity. 

The Chemical and Physical Hall is a large three-story brick building, 70x44 
feet, with a wing 61x31 feet. The first floor contains the chemical laborator- 
ies : the second the physical apparatus, and lecture room, while two draught- 
ing rooms occupy the third floor. In the basement are the heating apparatus 
and a large recitation room. This building is warmed by steam and supplied 
with water and gas, and with outfits for more than one hundred students to 
conduct individual experiments and investigations in chemistry and physics. 

North Hall is a two-story brick building, 40x70 feet. On the first flooi are 



lo\VA STATE COLLEGE OF 



the rooms for the departments of agriculture and zoology, and on the second 
floor are the rooms of the botanical department, with outfits for individual 
laboratory work similar to that done in chemistry and physics. 

Horticultural Hall is a frame building, containing on the first floor a large 
lecture room and a tool room. On the second floor is the horticultural 
museum. The cellar has two large rooms, one for the storage of garden pro- 
duct s. the other for the use of the nursery propagating department. A graft- 
ing room and propagating house are attached, heated by hot water. 

South Hall is a two-story brick building, which has been refitted for the 
Department of Domestic Economy, and contains the accessories of a model 
home as well as apparatus for instruction. 

The ( Office is a substantial two-story brick building, for the use of the Board 
of Trustees, the PresideDt, .Secretary and Treasurer. 

Six dwelling-houses upon the College grounds are occupied by Professors' 
families, and several others by foremen and employes. 

The College Creamery, a frame building, is conveniently situated near the 
farm house. The farm barns are adjacent— one of brick, for the horses, and 
one large farm bare, in the basement of which is a stable for one hundred 
head of cattle. There is also another stable near by for about fifty head. 
\i-<> sheep ami swine houses, buildings for machinery, etc. 

The Veterinary Buildings, costing ten thousand dollars, comprise a build- 
Ing for the offices and class-rooms of Professois in this department, and a 
hospital with all the modern appliances for the treatment of diseased animals. 
The Department of Veterinary Science is believed to be the best equipped 
for tin- work of an\ in the Western states. 

Engineering Hall is a large and substantial brick building on the West Side 
"i the Campus. On the third floor devoted to the Department of Civil Engin- 
eering are a large draughting room, instrument and recitation rooms and the 
private office ol the Professor in charge. 

on the second floor is ;i pleasanl reading room, provided with leading books 
.ind periodicals on civil and mechanical engineering topics, freely used by the 
ntfi oi both departments. 

The resl ol tie- building, hist and second floors and basement, are used by 

'in Department oi Mechanical Engineering. On the second floor is a large 

well lighted room for mechanical and free hand drawing, recitation rooms and 

'I"' Professor in charge. On the first floor are the machine 

equipped with power and hand machines and tools; and the office 

i man and bop instructor. The basemenl is fitted up tor work in mould- 

1 • Iding adjacent, contains the carpenter and pattern shops 

"" l l,: "" 1 , "" 1 :i "«i machines, and outfits of tools for individual 

ii ed for running the shops ami electric lights, 

•ed I'" making powei te ts, and boiler and pump tests, for the 

on and training ol the engineering Btudents. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 25 



In 1888 the Experiment Station building was erected and equipped at a cost 
<>t about nine thousand dollars, including library apparatus and material. It 
contains offices and laboratories for the Director, Chemist, Botanist and 
Entomologist, and library and propagating rooms. 



THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

The College Domain includes about 900 acres. Of this about 120 acres are 
set apart for College Grounds, and 120 for the Experiment Station. The 
former occupy the high land of the southwest part of the farm and include the 
campus, shrubbery plantations, young forestry plantations, the flower borders 
and gardens with the beginnings of a botanical garden, and the surroundings 
of the professors' dwellings. Gravel drives and walks lead to all parts of the 
grounds and to the various buildings, and the true principles of landscape 
gardening have been so faithfully observed in the grading and in the location 
of buildings and drives, as to make of the entire campus a large and beautiful 
park. The view of the surrounding country from the upper stories and 
towers of the Main Building is one of wide extent and great beauty. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Students seeking admission to the College must be sixteen years of age. 

Candidates for membership in the Freshman class, must bring testimonials 
of go- d moral character and give evidence of a thorough knowledge of 
Orthography, English Grammar, Arithmetic, United States History, Human 
Physiology (and except in Veterinary course) Algebra through simple equa- 
tion^. 

Entrance Examinations will be held at the College on the first and second 
daj B of each term. The first-class teachers' certificate of any county Superin- 
tendent will be received in lieu of an examination for Freshman standing, in 
the studies covered thereby. 

< ertificates from the following schools will also be accepted provided; (1) 
thai thc\ be based on examinations conducted within one year of presentation. 
and mark not less than 85 on a scale of 100; (2) that they be signed by the 
Principal or Superintendent, and certify to the required amount and grade of 
work in each study ; (8) thai they be made out on blanks furnished on appli- 
catlon to the President of the College. The right is however reserved of 
examining any candidate in any studj if occasion seems to require. 

Other schoolb of equal grade will be added to this list on application, with 
nent of course of study. The entire list will be revised each year. 



LIST OF HIGH SCHOOLS. 

\del. \!Im;i. \ Igona, Ames. Anamosa, Atlantic, Belle Plaine, Boone, 
Brooklyn, Burlington, Carroll, Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Chariton, Charles 
' ero ee, I larinda, Clinton, Columbus City, Corydon, Council Bluffs, 
Creator Da enport, Dennison, Des Moines, DeWitt, Dunlap, Eldora, 
I. ".in. therville, Fairfield, Fore«1 City, Fort Dodge, Guthrie Center, 

Hamburg, Hampton, Harlan, [da Grove, lndepend< nee. towa city, Iowa Falls, 
M . LaPorte, LeMars, Leon, Logan, Maquoketa, Manchester, 
Marengo, Marion, Mar*halltown, Mason City, Monroe, Monticello, Missouri. 
■ ■■ ai ; Vfu catlne, Nashua, Nevada, Newton, Odebolt, Onawa, 
Osceola, Oskaloosa, Ottumwa, Red Oak, Rock Rapids, 
Horm Lake Tama City, Tipton, Traer, Vinton, Wash- 
Waterloo, Web tei ( ity, Wesl Union, Wilton. Winterset. 



AQRICZTLTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 27 



LIST OF ACADAMIES AND OTHER SCHOOLS. 

Albion Seminary, Algona Academy, Burlington Collegiate Institute, De- 
corah Institute, Denmark Academy, Epworth Seminary, Howe's Academy, 
Iowa City Academy, Northern Iowa Academy, Springdale Seminary, and 
Washington Academy. 



HOW TO ENTER THE COLLEGE. 

Persons who desire to enter the college as new students should comply with 
the following directions : 

1. Write to the President for a college catalogue, and study carefully and 
comply with the "Requirements for Admission" on page 26, immediately 
preceding this. Then write to the President about three weeks before the 
beginning of the term, asking for a card of inquiry and information. 

2. On receiving the card of inquiry, write an answer opposite each ques- 
tion and mail the card to the President. If the answers you give accord with 
the "Requirements for Admission," a card of introduction will be sent you, 
which simply entitles you to admission on passing the examinations or giving 
the required proof of proficiency. 

3. When you arrive, at the opening of the term, present this card of in- 
troduction to the Steward, in his office at the rear of the chapel in the main 
building; select your room, pay the rent, make your deposit, (see page 28), 
and, without loss of time, show your receipt therefor to the President at his 
office, south of the main building. If you have not the proper certificate of 
proficiency in the studies required, you will there secure a card for examina- 
tion. 

4. Attend punctually every examination at the time and place indicated on 
that card. When all the examinations are completed, and your standings 
therein are marked on the card, return it to the President at his office. If 
you have passed the studies required with a standing of 3 or over, (4 being 
perfect), you will then sign the Student's Record Book and Contract, and se- 
cure a card of classification, which certifies your admission to the College and 
assigns you to your proper classes. 

5. Present the card of classification to each of the teachers having charge 
of the classes to which you are assigned, and attend thereafter every recita- 
tion of the term. 



THE CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

Students who fail to secure the required pass mark in any study must make 
up that study before it is taken by the next college class, or classify back with 
tint class in that study. If their mark is 2.75 or below on a scale of 4.00 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



:he\ will not be permitted to make up the work by themselves, but must take 
it over again with the next class. 

\ B. To enable students to make up back studies, such examinations as 
may be necessary will be held during the first week of each term. At the be- 
ginning of the year in February no student can classify for promotion with 
hi> class until he has passed a satisfactory examination on all studies but one 
<>i the preceding year, and that study must be passed by the end of the first 
week of tin next term. 



students' expenses, etc. 

No charge is made tor tuition to Iowa students. To those who come from 
outside the state >:;o.no tuition per year will be charged, unless remitted to 
worthy students by special vote of the Trustees, on recommendation of the 
Faculty. 

For board, heating, lighting, cleaning and care of the college buildings, 
students pay less than the items actually cost the Institution. Injury to col- 

property, <»t whatever sort, is charged to the author, when known; 
otherwise to the section, or the entire body of students, as may seem most 
just in the given case. 

dents who board in any of the college buildings furnish their own 
bedding, and all furniture for their rooms, excepting bedsteads. 
washstands, table-, and ward robes. They are earnestly advised to bring from 
home carpets, et... to make their rooms comfortable and 
cheerful. Male students in the lower classes, not physically disabled, are 

red !-.\ law to take the military drill, and purchase uniforms therefor. 
"Physical disability" must be certified by our Surgeon, Dr. Fairchild, on 
.[inination. 

The currenl expenses of students during the year 1888, were about as follows: 
in the Main College Building:— 

l;< i per week <j}2 25 

Lighting Mini beating, per week 4U 

.'■ii i a i- per week :>i 

rent, per term ;{ oo to t ^ 

term 75 

in He' Boaidlng Halls: 

•> ii 1 

tnd lighting, per week 25 

01 re< poi tei n, ; { U( i 

'" 1 term » 00 io 3 00 

1 term 75 

I I .1.1 . ■ ' II, I. Ml 

• term "i eventeen weeks 1 im 

eluded in. pltal building is provided, and tb s bospi- 

"' ''■ ' ".on 1 i.i-ni free nursing and medical attendance in 

1 hi rive Hi- He ,in also <>i checklngand controlling 

■""' """■ contuRlou disease mould they appear. The hospital 

■ ■ to Hi tudents, and the lusurance is piaoed at 

1 



Adlilcri/niiE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 29 



As security for the payment of all bills against him, each student, at the 
opening of the term, is required to make deposits with the Steward as follows : 

(tn board account in Main Building- (for those who board there) $20 00 

On board account in boarding- halls (for those who board there) 15 00 

< >n room and furniture account 5 00 

On General breakage and damage account 1 00 

These deposits will be returned on final settlement at the close of the term. 

All bills for each month must, without fail, be settled at the Steward's 
office on the second Saturday of the month following. 

The dining room will be opened on the evening preceding the respective 
days on which the spring and fall terms commence. No allowance on hoard 
hills is made for absence*. Students and others who bring guests to their 
tables are required to purchase meal tickets. All students are required to 
board and room in the Main Building or in one of the Cottages, except when 
permission to board elsewhere has been for good reason granted by vote of the 
Faculty. 

Text books and stationery may be purchased at the College Book-store at 
about twenty-five per cent below the average retail prices, that is actual 
cost to the College. 



MANUAL LABOR — SHOP, LABORATORY AND FIELD PRACTICE. 

The following regulations in regard to manual labor have been adopted by 
the Board of Trustees : 

1. The manual labor of students is divided into two kinds, viz : uninstruc- 
tive labor, which shall be paid for in money ; and instructive labor, which 
shall be compensated by the instruction given and the skill acquired. 

2. Uninstructive labor shall comprise all the operations in the work-shop, 
the garden, upon the farm and elsewhere, in which the work done accrues to 
the benefit of the college and not to that of the student. Instructive labor 
shall embrace all those operations in the work-shop, museum, laboratories, 
experimental kitchen, upon the farm and in the garden, in which the sole 
purpose is the acquisition of knowledge and skill. 

3. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the presence and under 
the instruction of the professor in charge, according to the statement made 
in each of the courses of study. 

4. The compensated labor furnished by the Department of Science and 
Agriculture, of Veterinary Science, and of Engineering, is given by each to 
it^ own students, and is eagerly sought. 

5. The "details" of compensated labor supplied by the needs of the 
various departments are given to the most faithful and meritorious students 
in each department. 

6. Uninstructive labor is paid for according to its value to the College, 
but no student should expect to pay the main part of his expenses by labor 



30 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



while here. The College cannot undertake to furnish the work, and even if 
it could, the student's time is chiefly needed for study. Still, many worthy 
and industrious students pay a considerable part of their expenses by labor. 
some $3000.00 being paid out by the College thus each year. 



GOVERNMENT. 



The crowded buildings of the College and the nature of the exercises, com- 
plicated as they are by laboratory work, shop practice and manual labor, make 
order, punctuality and systematic effort indispensable. This institution. 
therefore, offers no inducements to the idle or self-indulgent. All who are 
too independent to submit to needful authority, or too reckless to accept 
wholesome restraint, are advised not to come here. The discipline of the 
College i- confined mainly to sending away promptly those who prove on fair 
trial and faithful admonition to be of the above class, and to be doing more 
harm to the institution than can be compensated by any benefit they may 
themselves receive. Those who share here the benefits of the State and Na- 
tional endowments are expected to show themselves worthy of them. 

The ii-"' of tobacco by students on the College premises is fordidden. The 
presence of ladies and of members of the Faculty in the various rooms and 
halls renders this imperative, to say nothing of other considerations. Those 
who .ire already so addicted to the use of tobacco that they cannot cheerfully 
BUbmil to this regulation are advised to go elsewhere. Of course the use of 
Intoxicating beverages and of profane and obscene language is also forbidden. 



PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Officers and Btudents gather daily in the chapel for public worship, except 

on Wednesday, when the chapel hour is needed for military drill and dress 

parade, and on Saturday, when there are no college exercises. On Sunday 

morning at 10: 15 a discourse is given in the chapel by the President, one of 

""• Profe "i oi ;, Clergyman invited for the occasion. The object of ihese 

to emphasize ami enforce the principles of morality and of the 

tlan religion ; bul In a State institution like this it would be manifestly 

i h or to cotnroverl the tenets of sectarianism. 

i ac lit) require on Sundaj such conducl and decorum in and about the 

•■ building as befit the observance of the Sabbath. 



ITJRSKS OF STUDY. 

■ ol i udj air offered, as follows : 
i>" Courai in Science cmd Agriculture, of four years, aims to 
ilture in the ciences and other branches of learning which 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 31 



underlie agriculture and the other great industries of the country. The de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) is conferred upon those who complete 
this course. 

(3.) The Course for Ladies, of four years, meets a growing demand 
for the higher education of women. It provides an opportunity for a 
more thorough study of literature along with a somewhat lighter course in 
the natural sciences and mathematics. It leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Letters (B. L.) 

(3.) The Course in Mechanical Engineering, of four years, leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (B. M. E.) 

(4.) The Course in Civil Engineering, of four years, leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Civil Engineering (B. C. E.) 

(5.) The Course in Veterinary Science, of three years, leads to the degree 
of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D. V. M. ) 

The candidate for graduation in any of the courses must have met all re- 
quirements therefor. In the technical courses he must present a final thesis. 
In the course in Science and Agriculture and in the Ladies' course, orations 
are required in 1889. Thereafter theses will be required in these courses 
also. 

GRADUATING THESIS. 

The subjects of Theses shall be selected under direction of the Professor 
in whose department they are written, and submitted to the thesis Committee, 
with signed approval of the Professor, on or before the First Monday in 
April. 

It is expected that each thesis shall represent an amount of work equiva- 
lent to at least one exercise per week through the senior year. (It is often 
desirable that observations and laboratory work should extend over even a 
greater length of time, and students are encouraged to determine upon their 
subjects for thesis work as early in the course as practicable.) 

That it shall show the results of the student's personal study or investiga- 
tion, and be throughout original in matter and treatment so far as the nature 
of the subject will permit. 

That it shall be prepared under the supervision of the Professor in charge, 
the student making frequent reports of progress and having an outline of 
the matter ready for approval by the first week of the last term. 

The thesis ready for examination and marking with its specific title and the 
written approval of the Professor in charge shall be presented to the Thesis 
Committee at a date fixed by the Committee during the four weeks preceding 
Commencement Day. 

A type- written copy prepared according to rules held by the librarian must 
be deposited in the library before the student can be recommended for grad- 
uation. 

The graduation fee in each course is five dollars. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



THE COURSE IN SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST I'KKM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Algebra, Advanced— 5* 

Drawing— -2. 

Drill, Military 2. 

Elocution— 1. 

English : Language and Composition— 4. 

History— 6; or Latin— 5. 

Lectures Field, on Agriculture, with 

practice 5 hours. 
stock Breeding 2. 



Botany, Elementary— 2. 

Drawing 1 — 2. 

Drill, Military— 2. 

Entomology, Economic— 2. 

Geometry— 5. 

Horticulture— 2. 

Field Lecture— 1. 

Rhetoric, Applied— 3; or Latin— 4. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



I IK- I 11. KM. 



SECOND TEKM. 



Agriculture, Practical— 2. 
Botany. Systematic 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 1§. 
< 'hemistry, General— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Drill. Military 2. 
Phj sics, Mechanics '-'. 
Surveying, Land 5, eighl weeks. 

Practice, Field— 2. 
Trigonometry, Plane— 5, nine weeks. 



Botany, Oyptogamic— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Chemistry, General— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Drill, Military— 2. 
Geometry, Analytical— 5+ 
Horticulture— 2. 
Physics, Heat— 3. 
/oology— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 



I IRS1 l ERM. 

Botanj . Bacteriology I. 

Laboratory Practice I 
Calculus ■>. 
( hemisl ry, Quantitative 

Laboratory Practice :> 
Elocution 2 
German 5. 
Horticulture 2. 

1 ommercial :.'. 
Literature, English 3 



JUNIOR YEAR.! 



SECOND TERM, 



Literal ire, English— 3. 

Magnetism and Electricity 3. 
j :;. 
orators Pracl Ice -2. 



Botany, Applied— 1. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 

Chemistry, Organic— 3. 
Laboratory Practice -1 . 

Dairying— 2. 

Economy, Political— 3 or 5. 

Entomology— 5. 

German— 5. 

Hurt iculture— 3. 

Literature, English— 5 or 3. 

Physics: Light and Sound- 
La 1 io ia t ory Practice - 1 . 

Physiology— 4. 



I IK- I I I. KM. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



\ui Icull HI i I 

tnatoni) '.i Domec i Ic Animals 6. 

< h< tnh iry, Vgrlcultural Lab. Prac. 3. 
I M Ineralogj :.. 

■ luding human brain 

! 
I 
i I. 



SECOND TERM. 



Agriculture 3. 
Civilization, History of— 5. 
< Uimatology— 1. 
Drainage I. 

EthiCS and Civics— 4. 
In eels. Injurious I. 
Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary 
Pathology, Vegetable— 2. 
Thesis, Required -l. 



I Labon 
in the Junloi 



Indicate the number of recitations per week 
tori worh three hours count as one recitation. 
tleal Geometrj mas omil Botany. 

"'"-'",<„ s, , ul |,, ,,„,,.,,, i permitted to seleol from the 
"""•" < "i tudle aggregating (in addition to Elocution If 
arteen nor more than eighteen exercises per week. 



AURIC TLTVRE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



83 



THE COURSE FOR LADIES, 



FIRST TERM. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



SECOND TEfaM. 



Algebra, Advanced— 5. 
Drawing— 2. 

Elocution— 1. 

English: Language and 

tion— 4. 
French— 5, or Latin— 5. 



Composi- 



Botany, Elementary— 2. 
Drawing— 2. 
Economy, Domestic— 1. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Elocution— 2. 
French— 5, or Latin— 5. 
Geometry— 5. 
Rhetoric, Applied— 3. 
Zoology, Elementary— 2 (optional). 



FIRST TERM. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



SECOND TERM. 



Botany, Systematic— 2. 

Economy, Domestic— 1. 
Laboratory Practice— 1. 

French — 4, or Latin— 4. 

History, Ancient— 2. 

* And choice of Chemistry— 3, and 
Laboratory Practice— 2, or any two 
Of the following sciences: Physics— 
2, Trigonometry— 5, nine weeks, Ad- 
ditional Botany— 2. 



French— 4, or Latin— 4. 

History, Modern— 2. 
*And a choice of two of the follow- 
ing sciences: Botany— 4, Chemistry 
—4, Analytical Geometry— 5, Physics 
—3, Zoology— 4. 



FIRST TERM. 



JUNIOR YEAR.* 



SECOND TERM. 



Botany, Bacteriology— L 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Calculus— 5. 
Chemistry, Quantitative— 2. 

Laboratory Practice— 3. 
Elocution— 2. 
German— 5. 
Horticulture — 2. 
Law, Commercial— 2. 
Literature, English— 3. 
Phj sics, Magnetism and Electricity— 3. 
Zoology— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 



Botany, Applied— 1. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Chemistry, Organic— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Dairying— 2. 

Economy, Political— 3 or 5. 
Entomology— 5. 
German— 5. 
Horticulture— 3. 
Literature, English— 5. 
Physics, Light and Sound— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



SECOND TERM. 



Astronomy— 6. 

Chemistry. Soph, and .Junior— 5. 
Geology and Mineralogy — 5. 
German— 5. 

Psychology (including Human Brain)— 

5, three weeks. 
The>is (required)—!. 



Civilization, History of— c 
Domestic Economy— 1. 

Laboratory Practice— 1. 
Ethics and Civics -4. 
Pathology, Vegetable— 2. 
Physiology— 4. 
Thesis (required)— 1. 



In the Junior and Senior years the student is permitted to select from the 
Lisi Cor each term a number of studies aggregating (in addition to Elocution if 
chosen I, not less than fifteen nor more than eighteen exercises per week. 



34 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



THE COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 
1 111- 1 TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Algebra, Advanced— 5. 

Drawing', Free hand— 2. 

Drawing, Mechanical— 2. 

Drill, Military 2; 

Elocution— 1. 

English: Language and Composi- 

i ion— 4. 
French- ">. 
simp Practice 8 hours per week. 


Drawing, Free hand— 2. 

Drawing. Mechanical— 2. 

Drill, Military— 2. 

Elocution— 2. 

French— 5. 

Geometry— 5. 

Rhetoric, Applied— 3. 

Shop Practice 8 hours per week. 


SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
FIRS! 1 I : KM. SECOND TERM. 


< Jbemistry, General :». 

Laboratory Practice — 2. 
Drill, Militarj 2. 
I > aw Ing, Mechanical— 1. 

nci i\ . Descriptive— 3, 
Phj -ir-: Mechanics— 2. 
Shop ^ oik 8 hours per week. 
onometry and Surveying— 5. 
Fichi Practice— 1. 


Chemistry, General— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Drawing, Mechanical— 2. 
Drill, Military— 2. 
Geometry, Analytical— 5. 
Physics: Heat— 3. 
Shop Work 8 hours per week. 
Trigonometry. Spherical— 1. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 
I [RS l l ERM. SECOND TERM, 


Calculus •">. 

< oni uici 3, Law - ol 2, 6 weeks. 

I n. i w in-. Mechanical '.'-. 
Mechanics, Analytical 4, 12 weeks. 

Phj -.- 

Shop W oi k B hoiii per week. 

m Engine i. ■> week'-. 
St< am Enji me 2, 12 week- . 
Graphical I. 


Drawing, Mechanical— 2. 
Economy, Political— 3. 
Engineering Constructions— 1. 
Engineering, Mechanics of— 4. 
Physics, Special- :>. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Machine Design 1. 
Shop Work 9 hours per week. 


SENIOR YEAR. 
i IK81 II l.M. SECOND TEEM. 


I n i •• inj.'. Mechanical ".. 
ii' md Uollei - ".. 

1 i I, .; 

1 ,1 i. 

naiule i. 

houi pei 

Ol 


Designing .'. 

Engineering, Materials of I. 

Graphics I. 

Hydraulics 2. 

Machinery, Mechanics of 1. 

Mechanical Laboratory 9 hours per 

week, 
Phj sic8. Laboratory Practice '■'-. 
Thesis 5. 



AQRKT LITRE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 



35 



THE COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. SECOND TEEM. 


Algebra, Advanced— 5. 

Drawing, Free-hand 4 hours per week. 

Drill. Military— 2. 

Elocution— 1. 

English, Language and Composition— 4. 

French— 5. 

History— 5. 


Botany, Elementary— 2. 

Drawing, Free-hand 4 hours per wk. 

Drill, Military— 2. 
1 Elocution— 2. 
1 French— 5. 

Geometry— 5. 

Rhetoric, Applied— 3. 


SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Botany, Systematic— 2. 
Chemistr>, General— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Drill, Military— 2. 
Field Practice— 1. 
Geometry, Descriptive— 5. 
Physics: Mechanics— 2. 
Surveying and Trigonometry— 5. 


Drill, Military— 2. 
Field Practice— 1. 
Geometry, Analytical— 5. 
Physics: Heat— 3. 
Surveying, Railway— 5. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Calculus— 5. 

Mechanics: Analytical— 4 ,12 weeks. 
Ph> sics : Magnetism and Electricity— 3. 
Stereotomy and Drawing— 4. 


Economy, Political— 3. 
Electricity, Special— 3. 

Laboratory Practice— 2. 
Engineering, Sanitary— 3. 
Materials, Resistance of — 4. 
Surveying, Railway— 3. 


SENIOR YEAR. 
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


I designing— 3. 
Geology— -6. 
Psychology— 5. 

Structures. Bridge and Hoof— 5. 
Wood, Struct ure of— 1. 
Thesis begun. 


Civilization, History of— 3. 

Designing— 5. 

Lectures—:?. 

Structures, Bridge and Roof— 6. 

Walls. Retaining— 2. 
Thesis, Preparation of— 3. 



36 



IOWA COLLEGE OF 



THE COURSE IN VETERINARY SCIENCE, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 


FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM. 


Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 5. 


Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 2. 


Dissection and Clinic, 4 aft'n's per wk. 


Botany, Elementary— 2. 


Drill, Military 2. 


Dissection and Clinic, 3 aft'n's per wk. 


English: Language and Composition— i. 


Drill, Military— 2. 


Histology— 2. 


Medicine, Ve erinary— 5. 


Laboratory Pra< tice— 1. 


Physiology— 4. 




Zoology— 2. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 


1 [RSI 1 ! KM. SECOND TERM. 


Bo tan 5 . Pharmaceutical— 2. 


Anatomy of Domestic Animals— 2. 


• Ii-iim-i i\ . < ieneral 3. 


( Ihemistry— 3. 


Lab iratorj Praci ice— 2. 


Laboratory Practice— 3. 


ctlon and Clinic. 2 aft'n's per wk. 


Clinic, 1 afternoon per week. 


Drill, Militarj 2. 


Drill, Military— 2. 


Materia, Medica i. 


Medicine, Veterinary— 3. 


Physiology 3. 


( >phthalmology— 1. 


rj .'. 


Pathology, General— 2. 


Laboratory Praci ice— 1. 


Laboratory Practice— 1. 




Parasites, Animal— 2. 


SENIOR YEAR. 


I LBH l l ERM. SECOND TERM. 


Bacteriology 1. 


A oatomy of Domestic Animals— 5. 


■ . i s • . i \ p ra cti c e I . 


clinics, five afternoons per week. 


i hen i 


Medicine, Veterinary: Principles and 


oratorj Praci Ice 3 / 1st 5 w ks. 


Practice— 3. 


after 


Obstetrics— 1. 


pai ative 3. \ 51 ii week. 


< m bthamology— 1. 




Surgerj . Principles of < iperation— 1. 


otoi inn \ : Principles and 


Therapeul ics— 2. 




Therapeul ics. Surgical— 1. 


1 1,. 


Thesis find i w'ks before close term. 



AOBrrri.rrni-: am> mf.cii.wic arts. 37 



REMARKS ON THE COURSE IN SCIENCE AND 
AGRICULTURE. 



In the Freshmen and Sopohinore years this course is clearly defined, and 
but few elective studies are offered. 

In the Junior and Senior years, however, the student is permitted to select 
for each term a number of studies aggregating not less than fifteen nor more 
than eighteen exercises per week. The student may thus continue as fully as 
he desires through the last two years the practical agricultural and horticul- 
tural studies that are pursued the first two years as required studies. It will 
be observed that all studies in this course, indeed in all the courses, bear 
directly upon industrial life. No study can be selected unless the studies 
necessarily antecedent to it have been passed. Selections must be made 
before the expiration of the second day of the term, and once made cannot 
be changed. 

Any member of the Junior or Senior class who is a candidate for the degree 
of B. Sc. and who desires to pursue work in any general branch of study to a 
greater extent than is outlined in thisicourse, can do so if his written appli- 
cation for the same receives the endorsement of the professor in charge of the 
given study or department, and of the President, and provided it will not 
cause any conflict in the hours of recitation. The amount of time given to 
such study as decided by the professor in charge will be counted as a part of 
the whole amount of work required. In selecting such additional work the 
other studies making up the required number of exercises shall embrace the 
subjects most closely related to it, and this special study allowed shall not 
exceed one-third of the term's work. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Algebra. — In algebra there are two divisions. The first of these is com- 
posed of students who show by their entrance examinations thoroughness in 
arithmetic and a ready familiarity with the principles of algebra through equa- 
tions of the first degree ; the second includes all students who obtain a high 
standing in arithmetic, and pass the required examination in algebra, but 
who show in this latter study a want of thoroughness. Particular attention 
is given in this study to the explanation of the cardinal principles, and the 
drill in the solution of problems and questions is conducted with reference to 
fixing these principles in the mind of the student. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



Geometry. — All students who complete algebra and secure a standing of 
three (four being perfect) in either of the divisions in algebra are permitted to 
enter the class in geometry. This class is divided into two divisions, corres- 
ponding with those in algebra. The student is early taught the full meaning 
of a geometrical demonstration. He is warned against learning any proposi- 
tion by rote : and in order that he may not fall into this error, he is, at the end 
of the first book, assigned original theorems, which he is required to demon- 
strate. Be is expected not only to understand thoroughly each proposition, 
but to be able so to arrange and present the points of proof as to form a com- 
plete and perfect demonstration. 

E. W. Stanton, Professor, and A. E. Kiukpatrick, Instructor. 

Plane Trigonometry. — Instruction is given in this branch during the 
first nine week- of the Sophomore year. The class is thoroughly drilled in 
the nature and use of trigonometrical functions. 

si bveying occupies the remaining eight weeks of the first term of the 
Sophomore year. Thorough drill is given in the use of surveyor's instru- 
ments, and in the measurement of lines and angles and the computation of 

areas. 

C. F. Mount. Professor. 

Analyik ll Geometry.- This study is pursued by the Sophomore class 
during its second term. The course of instruction embraces determinate and 
Indeterminate geometry, it eluding a full examination of the conic sections. 
The underlying principles are brought prominently forward and discussed. 
The studenl i- required carefully to analyze each article, and solve the prob- 
'••in connected therewith. To secure thoroughness frequent reviews are 
given. 

E. W. Stanton, Professor. 

<'\i' i ii s. Instruction in calculus is given during the spring term of the 
Junior year. T<» enter this class it is necessary that the student should have 
• i the lowei mathematical studies of the course. In no case can this 
Btudj be pursued successfully without previous drill in analytical geometry. 
Tin- abstruse principles of this method of mathematical investigation are ex- 
plained upon the theory of rates, rather than upon the theory of infinitesi- 
mals. Instruction Is given by daily recitations and lectures, with a review 
ach Friday. Twelve weeks are devoted to differential, 
and the remainder of the term to integral calculus. 

E. W. Stanton, Professor. 

PHYSICS. 

i Ol Jtudj outlines the work in Physics. The 

there given. The subject is taught 

Qd recitations thereon. The work ottered in the 

; \ 'H'- ilture is fairly equivalenl to that found in Des- 



IQRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 39 



Chanel's Natural Philosophy, or Daniell's Principles of Physics. Experimen- 
tal demonstrations are given for the fundamental facts of the Science, illus- 
trating the various laws; and the applications of these laws in the various 
industries and arts are indicated. The object of lecture room experiment 
Is to illustrate scientific doctrine. What the student wants is not a large 
number of experimental facts, however well classified ; buta few well selected 
fundamental facts and the scientific doctrine which those facts represent. The 
method of instruction, in this department, is in harmony with the above state- 
ment. By this plan it is hoped that the thoughtful student will discriminate 
clearly between principle and illustration, and lay them away in memory 
accordingly. 

The first term Sophomore year is given to mechanics. Particular attention 
is given to the laws of motion, and to the doctrine of energy and the applica- 
tion of this doctrine in this branch of the subject. Text-book, Deschanel's 
Part 1. Heat is studied the second term Sophomore year. Heat is energy ; 
and it is from this standpoint that the whole subject is studied. More atten- 
tion is given to the quantitative relations of the various phenonema studied 
than to gathering statistics on the subject. Text-book, Maxwell's Theory of 
Heat. The first term Junior year the subject of electricity and magnetism is 
studied. The doctrine of Potential is made the co-ordinating principle in 
this ever widening field of Physics. Particular attention is given to the rela- 
tion of electricity to magnetism, as manifested in the fact of induction cur- 
rents ; the relation of electrical energy to heat ; and hence its relation to me- 
chanical power. In short, that the propositions of mechanics apply to electri- 
cal and magnetic phenonema. The c. g. s. system of units is explained, and 
their relations to the practical units developed. Text-book, Thompson's 
Elementaiy Lessons. 

In fall term Junior year. General Course, Optics and Acoustics are studied. 
The undulatory theory is made the basis of instruction ; and hence the funda- 
mental properties of the wave-surface are examined. Text-books, Optics, 
Lommel ; Acoustics. Tynclall. The Juniors, of this term, in the Engineer- 
ing- Courses, continue the study of electricity and magnetism. The Dynamo 
is made the basis of instruction. Text-book, Thompson's Dynamo-Electric 
Machinery. 

The Laboratory Instruction in Physics comes in the fall terms of both 
Junior and Senior years, in the M. E. Course, and in fall term of Junior year 
in the other courses. The exercises are progressive and entirely quantita- 
tive : illustrating general laws in all branches of Physics. The work consists 
of the theory and use of instruments of precision ; their calibration ; the deter- 
mination of physical constants ; the measurement of mechanical, thermal, 
optical, acoustical, eiectrical and magnetical properties of bodies; in such 
order and to such extent as the equipment of the Laboratory will permit. 

Apparatus. — The value of physical apparatus owned by the Department is 
about 88.000. among which are: a standard of length, a standard clock, a 
physical balance, a chronograph, a cathetometer, a calorimeter, resistance 



4.' IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 

coils, wheatstones bridge, current and potential galvanometers, high and low 
resistance reflecting galvanometers, a condenser, a standard B. A. Ohm. a Kew 
magnetometer, an electrometer — these are all, with the exception of the clock, 
imported apparatus from the best European makers. A Thompson-Houston 
dynamo (old pattern), several motors and the electric light circuit on the 
grounds afford opportunities of studying this blanch of electrical science. 
Through the courtesy of the Steward the electric light plant is made available 
to students to make such tests and measurements as actually obtain in 
practice. 

In comparing the above facilities with what is offered in the Mechanical 
Engineering course, it is readily understood that the elements of electrical, 
engineering, both theory and practice, are open to the student. The Labora- 
tory iiM'ii by the department, at present, consists of the physical lecture and 
apparatus rooms, and the two draughting rooms in the third story, elsewhere 
described. It is hoped that this strange anomaly will be rectified within 
another year. 

Astronomy is a five hour elective in the Senior year. Text-book, 
Young's Genera] Astronomy. As aids to the study of this subject, the 
department has a line celestial globe 32 inches in diameter, a sextant, reading 
to lo seconds of arc ; a telescope of 2)4 inch objective, equatorially mounted, 
right ascension and declination circles attached ; and a two prism Browning 
spectroscope. 

Sphi i:h \i. Trigonometry is a one hour study in fall term Sophomore 
year. This time is thoughl sufficient to familiarize the student with the fun- 
damental theorems of this branch of mathematics ; and, to give sufficient prac- 
o a- readilj to apply the same in problems relating to theoretical me- 
chanlcs, geodesy, and its simpler applications to spherical Astronomy. 

\i»\ \n- ED J'in-i< - may be taken in Senior year ; students looking for- 
ward to this work -hould be classified in Analytical Mechanics, and Calculus 
of Junior year. This work consists of two parts: (1) Laboratory work at 
■ in- per week ; (2) Text-book work five hours per week. 

l«u further information relating to work in this Department address, 

.1. C. EainjlR, Professor. 

CHHMISTRY. 

"ii in Inorganic chemistry begins with the Sophomore year and is 
1 ' |l! the com le e cepl the ladies course. During the first half of 

Hid lectures per week are devoted to descriptive 

»nd tl ■ . The laboratory practice, si\ hours per week, is 

tratethe principles studied in the class-room, each student be- 
ad '" perform all the necessary experimentation. En order better 
dent powei ol ob ervatlon he is required to describe the 

""i 'I'" phenomena observed and i<, trace the relation of the 
■ '" ""• principles whicl derlle them, in the second half of the 



AGRICULTURE AXD MECHANIC ARTS. 41 



year, the same general plan is pursued in the recitations and lectures, with 
the addition of practice in solving problems, writing reactions, and the study 
of the principles of qualitative analysis. The laboratory work, six hours per 
week, is devoted to qualitative analysis, consisting of a study of solubility, 
the examination of known material, and a separation of unknown mixtures. 
This term's work is required in the course in Science and Agriculture and in 
the Mechanical Engineering course. 

Quantitative analysis in the first half of the Junior year consists of density, 
gravimetric and volumetric determinations and separations, using first pure 
chemicals and afterwards impure substances. The laboratory work occupies 
nine hours per week. In addition to recitations upon the principles and 
methods of quantitative analysis, the student makes an elementary study of 
oxidation and reduction. 

The study of organic chemistry in the second half of the Junior year is 
experimental and theoretical, using Remsen's Organic Chemistry as text-book 
and laboratory guide. There are three recitations and three hours per week 
of laboratory practice. 

Agricultural chemistry in the first half of the Senior year consists of an 
elementary study of soiLs, manures, plants, milk and kindred substances. 

The study of organic chemistry in the second half of the Senior year con- 
sists of qualitative and quantitative analysis of organic compounds, compris- 
ing a study of known materials and followed by an analysis of unknown 
organic mixtures. The text-book is Pi escott's Proximate Organic Analysis. 
This is a "four hour" elective in the course in Science and Agriculture, open 
to students who have taken all of the above prescribed and elective work in 
chemistry, and in the order in which it is here laid down. 

The work in the Veterinary Course is done during the Junior year and a 
portion of the Senior year. The work is introduced by an elementary study 
of general chemistry, followed by a short course in qualitative analysis. 
This is followed by a short study of organic chemistry and urine analysis, 
Chemical and microscopical examinations are made of urine, in both its nor- 
mal and abnormal conditions. 

Students may take additional hours of work in chemistry in any of the 
lines of study here outlined by complying with rules of the faculty govern- 
ing electives. 

The Laboratory furnishes room for one hundred students working at one 
time, and is supplied with gas and water at each table. Ample facilities are 
offered for all the work described. 

The work offered in chemistry is sufficiently extended to furnish the stu- 
dent a good foundation for further study and research, either as an original 
investigator or as a practical chemist. The work is recommended as much 
for its educational value as for its practical utility. Students in chemistry 
are charged simply the actual cost of the chemicals and other materials used 
or destroyed in the prosecution of their work. 

A. A. Bennett, Professor. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



BOTANY. 

The elementary course in botany begins in the second term of the Fresh- 
man j ear. In this course the Morphology of Flowering Plants will be taken 
up. and the student is expected to become familiar with roots, stems, leaves, 
and flowers : the terms used in descriptive botany, and the methods of deter- 
mining the botanical names of plants. In addition to the regular class work 
each student is required to do some field work. Text books : Gray's Lessons 
in Botany, and Gray's Manual. 

In the first term of the Sophomore year, students are made familiar with 
the most important orders of the flowering plants. In addition to the sys- 
tematic work the student spends one afternoon a week in the laboratory, 
studying the tissues of Phsenogams and Vascular Cryptogams from a physio- 
logical standpoint. In addition to the class work each student is required to 
make a collection of seventy-five species of Phsenogams. Textbooks : Gray's 
structural Botany, Goodale's Physiological Botany. The course will also be 
supplemented by lectures. 

In the second term of the Sophomore year Cryptogamic Botany is taken up. 
Special attention is given to "rusts," "smuts," "molds," "mildews ;" espe- 
cially to such fungi as are injurious to cultivated crops. This course is 
accompanied bj lectures on the morphology and life history of different 
fungi, algae, lichens, and vascular cryptogams. Students in the general course 
are allowed to elect Bacteriology, which is a required study for the Senior 
Veterinarj students. The laboratory work consists of studying the germs 
ot various diseases, and methods of cultivation. In addition to the labora- 
toiy work there will be one lecture a week with special reference to sanitation 
and the means of preventing contagious diseases. The lectures may also be 
elected In the < ourse Cor Ladies. 

Pharmaceutical botanj has been specially arranged for students in the 

\ eterinarj course. In the laboratory some of the principal medicinal plants 

-11 up, supplemented l».\ a course of lectures. Students in the Junior 

and Senior years have ample opportunitj of studying forage plants, origin 

oi cultivated plants, diseases of plants, and the application of various fungi- 

ln the first terra of Ihe senior year the Civil Engineering students spend 
eel in a rtudj of the microscopical structure of various 
b fungi as are especially destructive in causing rot of railroad 
11 brid e etc. 

■■ lallj inicic ted In botanj may continue their studies in that 

h through the Junior and .Senior years. The facilities for such special 

are araph 'l lie laboratory is well equipped with apparatus for the an- 

on ol plants, and the herbarium, Including all groups of 

mean foi excellenl advance work in systematic botany. 

for the econd degree have abundanl facilities for the pursuit of 

Ion in the various branches of botanical science. 

L. il. r \ mm i.i,. Professor. 



.\nnicri.rriu: and mechanic arts. 43 



APPARATUS. 

The Botanical Laboratory is supplied with 24 sood working compound 
microscopes, each having a one-half and a one-sixth objective, giving suffi- 
cient power for all ordinary botanical work. In addition to these objectives, 
the Laboratory has three one-twelfth Leitz oil immersion objectives, besides a 
one-eighth and a one-twelfth Tolles water immersion. The Laboratory is also 
supplied with a line R. & J. Beck binocular, with all accessories. The Labor- 
atory is fairly well fitted up for doing bacteriological work, being provided 
with a steam sterilizer, after the Koch pattern, a breeding cage, plates, plate 
holders, cooling apparatus, etc. Thus giving the veterinary students increased 
facilities for prosecuting this important branch in connection with their work 
at the College. 

ZOOLOGY, ENTOMOLOGY AND GEOLOGY. 

In these studies laboratory work is required so far as possible, depending 
upon the size of classes, material available, etc., and this work is elaborated 
or discussed in class exercises, lectures, recitations, preparation of special 
papers, essays, etc. 

Economic Entomology. — A course of about thirty lectures upon injurious 
and beneficial insects, insecticides and remedial measures. The principal 
groups of insects are defined and each student examines typical forms, makes 
a collection of common species and prepares a descriptive paper from per- 
sonal study of some selected insect. Required of students in the course in 
Science and Agriculture, and optional for ladies. Second term, Freshman 
Year. Packard's ''Entomology for Beginners." 

Zoology (General Morphology.) — An introductory study of animal struc- 
tures. Dissection of types, especially the starfish, earth worm, clam, cray- 
fish and frog. (Systematic, with comparative histology and embryology) 
microscopical studies of representatives of the various animal groups, pro- 
ceeding from the simplest to the highly specialized forms, and intended to 
furnish .instruction in the methods of Zoological research. Lectures; text 
and reference books : Orton, Packard, Claus-Sedgwick, Huxley, etc. Labora- 
tory guides, Colton's Practical Zoology, Brook's Hand book. Second half 
Sophomore and first half Junior year. 

Entomology. — Two lectures or recitations and three afternoons laboratory 
work per week in fall term dealing with minute anatomy, embryology and 
classification of insects, and furnishing also additional practice in methods 
of Zoological research. Comstock's Introduction, Packard's Guide, etc., 
offered as elective to students who have ranked sufficiently high in antece- 
dent studies. 

Advanced or special work may be elected in the Senior year, which 
may consist of vertebrate dissection, (Parker's Zootomy) or Elements of 
Embryology (Foster and Balfour) and special studies on life histories of 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



selected forms with preparation of thesis. Candidates for second degrees 
ma\ continue such work with opportunity to pursue original investigations. 

Geology. — This embraces a study of the Principles (Le Contes Elements) 
a review of the Geology of Iowa: a study of typical fossils and preparation of 
rock sections ; essays on economic geology ; geological maps, etc. Five exer- 
cises per week of first term Senior year. Elective in General and Ladies' 
Courses; required of Civil Engineers. 

Students in Veterinary course are given two exercises per week second 
term of first year and three exercises per week in first term second year in 
Zoology, and two exercises per week in second term, second year on Animal 
Parasites. 

Teachers in other schools, who desire to spend a portion of their summer 
vacation in special work are allowed opportunities for work in the laboratory 
upon such lines a> can be profitably pursued. 

The Zoological Laboratory is supplied with twenty-five microscopes, various 
microtomes, including a Thoma, and other apparatus for microscopical study 
and gross dissections. A supply of marine animals properly preserved for 
laboratory work furnishes means for study of forms otherwise inaccessible to 
inland students. 

The museum arranged with special reference to students' use contains typi- 
cal examples in all the principal groups. A buffalo, Rocky Mouutain sheep, 
and <.thcr large mammals, a very complete set of Iowa birds, an unusu- 
ally large alligator and the set of marine invertebrates are among the more 
Btriking features of what is considered one of the best working collections in 

t he west. 

The collection of insects most of which is at present kept in the laboratory 
rooms at North Hall has received especial attention and is of particular value 
i<» students of the Iowa species. 

The museum rooms as well as the laboratory are open to students for the 
direel ntudj of specimens. Visitors are admitted every week day from 9 to 12 
\. m.. and I tu 5 i'. m. 

Herbert Osborn, Professor. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

'" "" '-''Mid term of the JuDior year Hie study of comparative and human 

'"atom, and physlologj Is taken up in a course of lectures and text-book 

;houl the term. The general and special finds of biology and 

-I the various organisms are described withasmuch 

"' detail ae the time win adroit, followed by a resume of thesub- 

1 evolution of the different systems of organs is traced from 

to their most differentiated forms. The course is in- 

i mi comparative embryology. 

I). S. K \ 1 1;( ii i i,D, I'rofessor. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 45 



BIOLOGICAL WORK. 

Bj combining the different biological studies of the General Course with 
cci tain studies of the Veterinary School, it will be seen that a student can 
devote two years almost exclusively to biological work. Those who desire to 
spend only a limited time, and who are not candidates for degrees, may, if 
properly prepared, select entirely from studies in these branches. The selec- 
tions possible are as follows: First term: botany, zoology and entomology. 
Second term: histology, botany, physiology and zoology or embryology. 
Third term : botany, histology, physiology, bacleriology and anatomy or 
paleontology. Fourth term : zoology, pathology, comparative and fcuman 
aDatomy and botany. 

AGRICULTURE. 

In offering a course in Agriculture to those who are to become our farmers 
in the future, we recognize : 

(1) That it is native ability that makes the successful man in any line of 
work, regardless of education. 

(2) That any education is a help to a farmer. 

(3) That a man may be perfectly successf ul on the farm after a thorough 
training in any line, classical, scientific, or technical. 

(4) That, from a lack of business ability, a man may fail as a farmer after 
the best college training in Agriculture ; education only makes more effective, 
but cannot change the powers of mind which nature has given. 

(5) That the best years of life for College work are also the best years for 
acquiring a business knowledge and training ; and, on that account, the College 
graduate is at a disadvantage, when first entering active life, unless he has 
associated his College work with his later occupation. 

With these facts in view, the purpose of the Course in Agriculture is to 
furnish, to those who wish to be farmers in the best sense, an opportunity to 
acquaint themselves with some of the many scientific questions which their 
daily work brings forcibly before them ; to enlist their efforts in working out 
problems yet unsolved; and, by a study of the applications of scientific 
truth in daily practice, to deepen and make enduring that intelligent interest 
in their work which makes the difference between delight and drudgery in 
the performance of any labor. 

SCOPE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The main studies, aside from English and Mathematics, are Chemistry, 
Physics, Botany, Zoology, Geology, Veterinary Science, and Bacteriology — 
which see under their appropriate heads. 

The following is a partial statement of the more distinctively agricultural 
part of the work. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



Freshman Near: first term: breeds of live stock; forms of animals; the 
ogical classification of the domestic animals; the principles of heredity 
and their application to the breeding of live stock. 

Sophomore year ; first term: brief notice of the chemical composition and 
physical properties of air and water in their relations to the soil and plants ; 
classification of soils; tillage; tillage implements; the grasses and cereals ; 
clover and forage plants; rotation; saving and applying manure; farm 
machinery, history of development and principles of construction; farm 
buildings, principles of design and construction; farm accounts ; general 
farm management ; employment of men, etc. 

Junior year; second term; — dairying; dairy breeds; profitable feeding for 
milk, at different seasons and under different conditions; the physical prop- 
erties of milk; its chemical constituents; physiology of milk secretion ; dif- 
ferent systems of raising cream; of making butter; salting, packing and 
marketing. 

To illustrate and demonstrate the various problems there is upon the farm 
;i (lain of seventj cows, composed of pure Shorthorns, Holsteinsand Jerseys, 
with their grades. The dairy barn is ample for eighty cows, and has facili- 
ties for storing food and making experiments upon a corresponding scale. 
The creamery is a substantial structure, with a fair supply of dairy apparatus. 
With a fair knowledge of the sciences on which agricultural practice is 
based, the student in the Senioi year is prepared to take up the more difficult 
questions thai pertain to farm operations. 

Imongthe important topics are the following: Veterinary anatomy and 

medicine ; analysis of milk, feeds, manures, soils, etc. ; stock feeding; drain- 

climatologj ; the origin and formation of soils; their physical and chem- 

•roperties; the soil as a source of food to crops; production of organic 

matter ; source and formation of the nitrogenous constituents of plants ; of the 

asb constituents; their importance and distribution; theory of manuring; 

composition, value, manufacture and application of manures and fertilizers ; 

abilit) ol -'»iis to absorb and retain fertilizing matter from solutions ; loss by 

'-> removal of crops; -daw of minimum;" extensive and inten- 

■ ming, etc. 

The farm barns are quite extensive, and as far as the funds will allow will 

■ d up with the besl arrangements for stabling stock. 

pure-bred animals the farm has Shorthorn, I Iolsiein and Jersey cattle, 

dale horses, Shropshire sheep and Poland-China swine as specimens of 

tive breeds, and to Illustrate the principles of heredity, etc. 
Intended thai as far as these individual animals are kept as represen- 
dlfferem breeds, they shall be the best of their kind and a credit to 
the < ollege. 
in the dalrj the greater part of the cows are high grades of the three 
oh upply the class in dairying with material for 
i and the Steward's Department with milk. 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 47 



The excellent Veterinary Department of the College gives rare facilities for 
the study of the anatomy, physiology, hygiene, diseases, treatment and care 
of domestic animals; and the agricultural students are given every opportun- 
it\ to avail themselves of these facilities. 

L. P. Smith, Professor. 

HORTICULTURE AND FORESTRY. 

These studies form a part of the Course in Science and Agriculture. Singly 
and alone the time allotted to this technical line of study and practice could 
accomplish little more than to make the student familiar with some of the lead- 
ing modes'and methods of empirical gardening, considered mainly as a mere art. 
Supported, however, by the full course in natural sciences, the routine of horti- 
cultural operations rises above the level of unreasoning custom to the rankof 
applied science. The cultivated plant becomes a thing of life, varied in 
vitality, habit of growth, and fruitfulness by conditions of soil and air more 
or less under. control. 

The studies besrin with the second term of the Freshman year. No text 
books are used in this or the Sophomore year, as in the consideration of the 
subjects of small fruit-growing, orcharding, lawn-planting, flower-border, 
and forestry, we have no text book as yet adapted to our prairie soil and cli- 
mate. Instruction is imparted by lectures, making every possible use of the 
many instructive object lessons of the grounds, the nurseries, the orchards 
and the horticultural museum. 

The supporting studies in botany, chemistry, entomology, agriculture, etc., 
tit the Junior class for the intelligent consideration of theoretical horticulture 
as outlined in "Lindley's Theory of Horticulture," enabling the student to 
comprehend important principles pertaining to vital force, germination, root 
and stem growth, leaf formation and functions, climatic adaptation, etc., inti- 
mately associated in our State with failure or varied degrees of success in all 
horticultural operations. 

MEANS OF PRACTICAL ILLUSTRATION. 

1. The vegetable gardens. 

2. The flower borders. 

•'.. The ornamental grounds. 

4. The experimental nurseries. 

5. The experimental orchards. 

6. The small fruit plantations. 

7. The forestry plantations. 

8. The propagating rooms. 

!). The propagating pits under glass. 

10. The collection of native and cultivated woods. 

11. The collection of injurious and beneficial insects. 

12. The set of abnormal and diseased growths. 
L3. A set of fac-simile fruit casts. 

14. The horticultural museum, now accumulating. 



48 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



LABOR. 

To illustrate each branch, and enable the student to become familiar with 
methods and processes, and to acquire some skill, he is expected to engage in 
such labor as will best promote a knowledge of the particular study in hand 
for about five hours each week under the instruction of Professor or foreman. 
Such labor combined with instruction is, in the course of study, denominated 
"Field Lectures with Practice" or Farm and Garden Instruction. 

J. L. Budd, Professor. 

PHILOSOPHY. 
PSYCHOLOGY. 

The study of Psychology supplies two wants. First: It gives an analysis 
of ihe intellectual powers and discovers the laws of thought, thereby enab- 
ling the student to think with greater accuracy and clearness on any subject; 
and since success in every kind of activity depends on clearness of thought, 
psychology is one of the most "practical" studies. 
Second : Psychology as taught here clearly sets forth the fundamental 
siples and mutual relations of the industrial sciences, the incipient unit 
in each, the processes of experimentation, discovery and research, and the 
underlying principles of association which render the classifications of the 
various sciences possible, and naturally place the industrial sciences in 
related groups. 
The Btudy occupies five hours per week of recitations and lectures the first 
half of the Senior year. Welch's Psychology is used as a text book. It is 
lemented by lectures and by library work, with Ilamilton, Cousin, Por- 
Spencer, Lain. 1, add and Dewey as the principal collateral works. Writ- 
and discussions are required from each member of the class. 

W. I. Chamberlain, Professor. 

ETHICS. 

last term of the senior sear is devoted to a study of the groundwork 
ol moral science. This studj follows pyschology or mental science in the 
It mus1 resl fundamental^ upon it. (Hitler's Beginnings of 
and parts ol Janet's Theorj of .Morals are used as text books, supple- 
mented b; library work and by lectures; the main object of the whole being 
upon the mind of the student the belief that man has a moral 
orld Is, for man. a moral world, created and ruled by a 
moral ends; that, in do narrow sense, "honesty is the best 
thai conducl morally is the wisest settled principle of 

il oui ipiritual environment favors right conduct; that there is "a 
thai makes for righteousness," and that it is, in the 
towo'fc win., and noi against, that Power; and, finally, 
ripture apprehended by our reason, are on the whole 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 49 



our best means of learning what is the mind and will of that Power. Princi- 
ples are sought; mere questions of casuistry are avoided. The last four 
weeks of the term are devoted to lectures on Civics; a careful study of our 
Republican Government, and especially of our rights and their limitations 
under, and our duties towards, such a Government.. 

W. I. Chamberlain, Professor. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

In this division of social science are taught, by text-books, familiar lectures 
and discussions, the laws of labor — its products and their costs ; the princi- 
ples of capital, money, foreign trade, tariff, taxation, and all the influences 
that quicken or retard exchange. The student thus gains a thorough acquain- 
tance with the scientific data that underlie and regulate industry, and becomes 
familiar with the principles that should determine all questions of public 
policy concerning which there is so wide a diversity of opinion. 

COMMERCIAL LAW. 

It is the aim in this study to present the general principles of law relating 
to ordinary business transactions. Contracts, agency, partnership, sale of 
goods, commercial paper, and real estate are studied. The changes in the 
common law, made by the statutes of the State, are set forth by means of 
lectures. Particular attention is given to the forms of notes, bills, drafts, 
checks, etc., and by frequent reviews and examinations the student is made 
familiar with the requisites of the more common business papers. 

E. W. Stanton, Professor. 

LITERATURE, LANGUAGE. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND APPLIED RHETORIC. 

Instruction in English Composition is given during the first half of the 
Freshman year. The correct expression of thought through written language 
is taught, and enforced by frequent exercises. A clear knowledge of the 
grammatical structure of the English sentence is sought. A thorough knowl- 
edge of spelling, punctuation and the proper use of capitals is presupposed, 
but if found to be lacking on the part of any, special extra drill is given, and 
work required. 

In the secoud half of the Freshman year the time of three recitations each 
week is devoted to a series of exercises in applied Rhetoric, in which the 
design is to familiarize the mind with those details of composition and expres- 
sion, which are most in requisition in practical life, and are usually most 
neglected ; going no further in the philosophy of this branch than these practi- 
cal ends will indicate and permit. The attempt is to teach the pupil to express 
his thoughts clearly and forcibly by means of written language. 

E. A. Kirkpatiuck, Instructor. 



50 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



ELOCUTION. 

The system of instruction in expression is that taught in the Emerson Col- 
lege of Oratory. Boston, and is based upon the discoveries of M. Delsarte 
ami Dr. Emerson. Its object is to secure the health and freedom of the 
body, sweetness and volume of voice, and the culture of the mind. 

Talks on Physiology, as connected with the study of expression, will be 
given throughout the course. 

Recitals are given occasionally in each class. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

/) Relaxing exercises for all parts of the body. 
i r oic< -Direction of Tone. 
R< ndering — First step. Analysis. 

SECOND TERM, 

Qt bPu n Exercises for promoting dignity of carriage and grace of movement. 
Void Exercises for freeing the throat and increasing the resonance of the 

voice. 

Rendering Second and third steps. Analysis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Gestwn Review. Analysis of gesture exercises. Attitudes. 
I '"<" i:<\ lew. Exercises for flexibility of speaking voice. 
Rendering Third and fourth steps. Analysis. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 

Review. Responsive Gesture. 
Review. Additional Exercises. 

R< /.</, i ,„,,. The four steps, with special drill on the fourth step. 

SECOND TERM. 

anced Gesture. 

i ■- lew. 

' ritlcal i m.i \ of one of Shakespeare's dramas. 
81 udj <»i oration . 
i j oi orations. 



AdRlCVLTlRE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 51 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Three hours each week during the first term and five hours each week dur- 
ing the second term of the Junior year are devoted to the study of English 
Literature. There are three courses— first, a course in English Prose from 
Mandeville to Macaulay, in the first term: Secondly, a course in English 
Poetry from Chaucer to Cowper, and a third course in American literature, 
in the second term. Lectures are given ; the student is required to write a 
-cries of strdies of the chief authors; and selected works are read and 

criticised. 

A. C. Barrows, Professor. 

LATIN. 

The study of Latin is confined to the Freshman year of the course in 
-Science, and the Freshman and Sophomore years of the course for Ladies. 
A> so few of the patrons of this College are able to secure instruction in 
Latin at their homes, a beginning class will be formed. The Freshman class 
will be carried through Ahn-IIenn's Short Latin Course. The Sophomores 
will read Caesar and Virgil. 

Latin is studied in this College chiefly as a means of learning the principles 
of language, the etymology of English words, and the principles of English 
syntax. It is also a valuable aid in learning the nomenclature of the sciences 
pursued here. The attempt is to teach it in the way best adapted to promote 
these ends. In the view of Trustees aud Faculty, the object of the College, 
as set fourth in the law of Congress making the land grants that form the 
munificent endowments of this and similar State colleges, does not require 
that extended study of the Latin language and literature which may be desir- 
able in colleges founded in another way and for a somewhat different purpose. 
Such knowledge is acquired as shall be valuable in itself for the purposes 
named, and shall fit the pupil for further study himself should occasion 
require, and enable him to teach Latin in any ordinary school. The Greek 
language is not taught. 

A. C. Barrows, Professor. 

FRENCH. 

French is an elective study in the Freshman and Sophomore years in the 
Ladies course, and is obligatory in the Freshman year of the Civil and Me- 
chanical Engineering courses. The primary object in the study of French is 
reading, therefore only so much of the grammar is taught as will facilitate 
fluency of translation. 

During the first term. Freshman year, attention is given to pronunciation 
and to exercises both oral and written. 

Thorough drill is given in verbs and the student has some practice in trans- 
lation. In the second term the student will have mastered the most of Part I. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



of Otto's French Grammar, or its equivalent, including the irregular verbs 
and will devote much time to translation. 

At the end of the year, he should be able to read ordinary scientific works 
or text-books in French. 

In the Sophomore year, the grammar is finished and standard French 
authors are read. 

GERMAN. 

The study of German is confined to the Junior year and first term 
Senior year. During the first year the student is instructed in the 
principles of grammar, and gains a knowledge of declension, gender and 
conjugatioD so that he may with ease translate ordinary German prose. 
"Otis' Elementary German" and k 'Grimm's Maerchen" are used. The third 
term i- devoted to reading Schiller and selections from the best German nov- 
elists, while special attention is given to reading at sight. 

This >hort course is not sufficient to give one a mastery of the language 
nor make him familiar with its literature. 

The object in view is that of securing a reading knowledge of German. 
Bj the methods pursued, the student gains a practical vocabulary and may 
with a little practice, write and speak with correctness. 

Miss Lillie M. Gttnn, Professor. 

HISTORY. 

Iii the Ladies' course History is taught, two exercises each week, through 
the Sophomore year. In the other courses it has five exercises each week in 
the first teim of the Freshman year. 

The History of England is carefully studied, with special reference to those 
Institutions and ideas which receive their final developement in the Constitu- 
tion of i he i nlted States. 

HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION. 

"id tei in Of the Senior year, one hour a day is given to this 

1 i in -t makes a rapid review of Hie progress of the race, using 

Audi' ite of General History, which is supplemented by a course of 

then divided into sections for the more careful study 

lected civilizing forces. In this part of the course the 

ccupied in hearing written reports from members of the class 

in the library, special lines oi research. 

\. < !. Barrows, Professor. 






IGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC A UTS. 53 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

It is not intended to complete the education of the thorough soldier, but to 
fit young men for filling intelligently positions in the State troops as line offi- 
cers and company instructors. The constant demand for men thus trained 
emphasizes the value of a thoroughly organized and well sustained military 
course. The chief advantages derived are the acquirement of a dignified car- 
riage of the person, a gentlemanly deportment and a self-respecting discipline, 
with habits of neatness, order and punctuality. Opportunities are afforded 
each cadet for extending the studies in military science as desired, the College 
being provided with the necessary arms, accoutrements and outfits for drill 
and instruction in the infantry, artillery, and signal tactics, for which 
special classes will be formed. Lectures on military subjects are delivered 
throughout the course, and regular battalion drill and dress parade take place 
each Wednesday and Friday afternoon. All male students of the College, 
except such as may be excused for good reason by proper authority, are re- 
quired to become members of the College battalion, and wear the prescribed 
uniform during military exercises. 

Capt. J. Rush Lincoln, Professor. 



TO WA STATE COLLEGE OF 



THE COURSE FOR LADIES. 



This course is much the same as the general course for gentlemen, except 
that more time is devoted to language and literature, and less to pure and 
applied science. A careful examination of the arrangement of studies, (see 
tabulated arrangement, page 33), will show that a lady may pursue a lan- 
guage studj throughout the course and combine with it any two of the five 
named sciences. A lady student, for example, may take two years of Latin 
and two years of German or two and a half years of either Latin or German 
and a year an. I a half of French. In addition to the other literary studies 
the lady student lakes botany one year and has the choice of any two of the 
following sciences, viz: mathematics, physics, chemistry, zoology, and vege- 
table physiology. Opportunities are given, to such as desire it, totakelessons 
in music an. I painting, and the very best instruction is provided in both these 
branches, students in addition to recitations and lectures upon the various 
ii domestic economy receive practical training in all branches of house- 
wei k and general household management. They are not required to perform 
eater amount of labor than is necessary for the desired instruction. 
Other course 8, especially the Course in Science, are also open to ladies. 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Ii [g the purpose of this Course to interest and instruct the young women 
ding ii,,- College in the manifold and complex duties relating to the 

borne. 

'Ill,- topics taken up in the lecture room are chosen with a view to securing 
t., the Btudenl a knowledge of practical and systematic methods of rendering 
home a pleasant and healthful abode. 

I | e laboratorj practice is conducted upon the principle that no calling 

requires tot it- perfeel mastery more of practice combined with theory than 

oi i he housekeeper. 

The course in the second lerni Freshman year is devoted mainly to the 

,,! ii e Boston School Kitchen as a text-book, combined with laboratory 

I Instruction in regard to the (dements contained in our 

and theli proper combinations. Also the right adaptation of food 

!, mperament, occupation and climate, as based upon scientific princi- 
and dietet Ic , 
[n the in-' term of the Sophomore year special attention is given to the 

Ol meals, the purchase and care of family supplies, and 

hold management, Including household accounts. Also invalid 



AinU'lLTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 55 



cookery, the care of the sick and special hygiene, consisting of a course of 
lectures on the laws of life and health, especially woman's health and well 
being. 

During the last terra of the Senior year there will be a general review r of 
the work here outlined in preparation for the systematic and intelligent 
performance of the serious duties and responsibilities, which it is woman's 
highest privilege to assume in her capacity of housekeeper. 

Mes. Eliza Owens, Instructor. 

MUSIC. 

An opportunity is given to such as desire to take private lessons on the 
Piano- forte the Pipe Organ, in Voice Culture and in Harmony. Classes are 
formed each term in sight-singing and advanced chorus work. 

In the study of the Piano-forte the pupil is required to pursue the most 
thorough modern system of technical training practicable. Only the compo- 
sitions of acknowledged masters are used in instruction. Pupils may com- 
plete the first four grades of the New England Conservatory of Music, and 
enter the fifth grade in that institution without examination. 

Students are advised not to begin the study of the organ until they are 
able to play with proper phrasing and execution Heller's Studies Op. 47. 
Special attention is given in this study to the art of accompanying, to the 
study of registration and pedal phrasing. 

In the cultivation of the voice attention is first given to the development of 
the same timbre and purity of tone throughout the entire compass of the 
voice, correct management of the breath, vowel formation, distinct articula- 
tion and expression. 

In Harmony, the attention of the pupil is drawn to the treatment of inter- 
vals, chord progressions, modulations and the writing of chorals. 

The College has recently been furnished throughout with new Knabe pianos. 
It also has a two-manual pipe organ, with two octaves of pedals and a variety 
of registers. 

EXPENSES. 

For private instructions, two half hour lessons per week for the College 
term $15.00. Pupils may take one lesson per week at the same rate. Single 
lesson sixty cents. No deduction will be made for temporary absence from 
lessons. 

Class lessons per term $3.00. Instruction is given in Sight-singing to 
members of the Freshmen class free. 

Use of piano one hour each day forty cents per month or $1.50 per term. 
For the use of the organ, a blower's fee of ten cents an hour. 

Miss Eva F. Pike. Instructor. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS IN THE DEPARTMENT. 

Private instrumental 41 

Private vocal 22 

Sight-singing 61 

Chorus .- 37 

Harmon} 3 

Not enrolled in any other department of the College 13 

Number taking two or more music studies 29 



THE COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 



The Course in Mechanical Engineering does not aim to make machinists 
though including thorough teaching in machine work. It assumes it to be 
the business of the mechanical engineer to contrive and operate means for 
converting the materials and forces of Nature to his own ends, and that the 
design, construction and supervision of machinery constitutes his chief work. 
The following are the foundation principles upon which it is aimed to build 
up this course : 
The greatesl possible breadth of general education; 
Complete mastery of fundamental engineering principles ; 
The actual performance of some Engineering Work involving scientific 
me hods in construction, investigation and design; 

Unceasing contact, from the beginning to the very end of the course, with 
the Bcience of mechanics, its applications, measurements and the study of its 
laws. 

The regular four years course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Mechan- 
ical Engineering. When completed a fifth and sixth years may be taken for 
""• higher degree of Mechanical Engineer, in such studies as the student 
ea under the approval of the head of the Department and of the Faculty. 
Tin Course ^nd Plan of Instruction.— The student entering in Fresh- 
aiming at mechanical engineering as his profession, needs first of 
all to know the goal before him What engineering is. All available means 
to familiarize aim somewhat, with ordinary engineering processes 
and the highest achievements of great engineers. In every case work has 
upon materials; he ai once begins work in the shops, and from 
bal work is. will, its continuous effort and system ; 
aterlals are. Butworh has a scientific basis. To construct, 

' B machine; one which Works, is durable and economical; 

'"""<• calculations, close planning. He is taught by actual 

"■ '" own, with mi,-, watch and scales, to find the horse- 

; ' openginewith Imple apparatus, and learns the exact meaning 



VORICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 57 



of ■•work.'" Be measures the power used, and work done by his lathe, and 
learns the simple relations of "power," "work," "force," "time" and 
"space," what "mass" is, and what are its relations lo the other quantities. 
So he begins his acquaintance with the laws of mechanics under which he 
has chosen to work. 

lit- must also have clear ideas of the properties of materials, and soon he 
is shown how to measure the strength, elasticity and stretch of iron, steel and 
wood with the testing machine. Other qualities, not capable of precise 
measurement, become familiar from the work and instruction of the Shops. 

Since desiguing is a chief end, he at once begins {drawing, which has 
aptly been called the '"language of design." In using and making draw- 
ings he reads and writes this language, and learns at length even to think in 
it if thoroughly trained in descriptive geometry. 

Besides the work just named, the Freshman studies include the ordinary 
English branches and certain subjects required as the first work of the other 
courses. Some of these, as mathematics and French, prepare directly for 
later work iu engineering, while others are valued as increasing the mental 
grasp so much needed by all engineers. 

In the Sophomore year the principles named as regulating the choice of 
work again find application. Military drill and general scientific studies in 
physics and chemistry, including chemical laboratory work, are taken with 
the students of the other courses. Special lectures upon the chemistry of 
the metals and the study of the physical laws of heat, electricity and me- 
chanics, lead toward Mechanical Engineering, and the same is true of survey- 
ing, descriptive geometry and all the mathematics of the year. Mechanical 
drawing, ^elements of design, practice in shop and ftest-work are entirely 
of an engineering character and are fully described further on. 

In the Junior year political economy forms, perhaps, the only study of a 
general character, calculus and the laws of contracts being studies prepa- 
tory for engineering work. 

Class room work in theoretical engineering begins this year. The 
study of the steam engine is carried through the first term, and also 
uses much of the time devoted to drawing throughout the year. The princi- 
ples of de.sign are considered for each part, valve diagrams and steam dia- 
grams involving inertia, are worked out, the elements of a particular engine 
are planned by the class, and a short study is made of the graphical statics 
of mechanisms. Attention is later turned to a variety of valve and link 
motions, to different types of engines, and lastly to pumps and condensers. 

Sonic of this work is covered by weekly lectures and recitations in the 
second term, while the remainder is draughting work taken at regular times 
for that study. 

After live weeks study of calculus (which comes daily through the first 
term), the Juniors begin the mechanics of engineering, taken four hours 



+ See paragraphs on Practice work given below. 
•■• Se Course of Study, page 34. 



58 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



weekly till the close of the year. This comprises analytical mechanics and 
strength of materials, and also the opportunity of frequently seeing practical 
application of these studies, in actual measurements of power and tests of 
materials. 

The physics taken by the Engineers this year is specially chosen for their 
needs, and deals wholly with heat, mechanics and electricity. 

It includes both class room and laboratory work, and gives them just the 
knowledge of electricity required by those graduates in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing who intend starting out in the practical work of electricity for which 
there is now an extend* d field. 

In fact, for all electrical measurements and similar iustrumental work, 
there is quite as full an equipment as in schools giving the so-called Electrical 
Engineering Course, now becoming so common. 

Some provision for an electric power laboratory is alone required to fur- 
nish all that is needed for such a course, and will without doubt be supplied 
as the demand for it, already pressing, gains further strength. 

In Senior year English literature is taken for one term as being a study 
indispensable for every educated man, and at this point finds fuller apprecia- 
tion than if coming earlier when, also, the time is more needed for subjects 
preparatory to purely technical work. 

The theoretical and applied engineering studies of this year are of great 
interest and importance. Kinematics and mechanics of machinery, involving 
as they do systematic treatment of machine motions : of the conversion of 
external forces into work after transmission through the parts of a machine, 
ami of methods of proportioning these parts to the stresses they carry — these 
are the studies which claim chief attention, and average five hours weekly 
of class room work throughout the year. 

Machine drawing and designing comes twice a week, both terms, and the 
graduating thesis, the requirements for which are *elsewhere given, is begun 
in the first term and is allotted the time of a "five hour study" for the entire 
second term. 

For Senior first term subjects wo have thermodynamics with problems on 
" Heat as used in Prime movers" as a four hour study, heat engines and boilers 
twice weekly with practical considerations of design, and shop work for one 
day of each week. 

The studies of the second term are: One hour in graphics of framed 
structures. Two hours in hydraulics, a subject of growing importance as elec- 
tric transmission of energy is being gradually perfected. Two afternoons 
devoted to physical laboratory work, chiefly electrical in character. And a 
in II day each week to experimental work in engineering tests, fully explained 
below under "engineering laboratory work." One lecture a week on the 
materials or engineering, and the mosl important engineering structures 
and processes will also be given during the second term of the year to the 
Senior and .Junior classes. Library references are used with more or less 
1 1 pagee :.';» and 30, 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 59 



freedom, and examination are set both for these and for matter considered 
in the class room. 

Besides the regular class room work one hour weekly is devoted to review 
of the best engineering journals by the Juniors and Seniors of both Civil 
and Mechanical Engineering Departments, in which the instructors also take 
part. 

Practice Work — As given in this course may be put down under three 
heads as follows : Shop work, drawing and design, and engineering labor- 
atory work. 

Shop Work — Is designed to give familiarity with the arts of engineering 
by eight or nine hours weekly spent in w°rk in the shops. While the evident 
value of making complete articles is recognized, every mechanical principle 
involved, and all the capabilities of the various machine tools must surely 
be mastered. 

To compass this in such limited time, exercises, carefully chosen and sys- 
tematized have been adopted, in which skill in manipulation and evident ap- 
plication of mechanical principles are put first, useful production being a 
secondary, though a desirable end. This method, universal in teaching chem- 
istry, is equally good here. In this way the shop-work can be made progress" 
ive, from simple processes to those more difficult and involving greater skill. 

As the system is perfected, and in proportion to the skill displayed by indi- 
viduals, the interest and benefit coming from "making something of use" to 
plans laid out on paper, can be reached. 

The material used, is furnished the student at lowest wholesale rates, and 
to cover this expense each one is required to deposit $5.00 at the opening of 
the term, the balance bein* refunded at the close. 

Each student provides himself with a few of the tools he most uses, a list of 
them being furnished him at entrance. All others are furnished as needed 
from the tool room on the "brass check" system now used in all good 
machine shops. 

In all the work of the shops, students are on duty for the particular exer- 
cise shown by the table for each day of the course, and are assigned to separate 
machine tools at which they follow each other in regular rotation. In this 
way all go through with every part of the work, though not necessarily in the 
same order. 

In the practice of the shops, the general knowledge of a superintendent or 
foreman is first aimed at, while the attainment of individual skill is also 
sought. The following are the subjects taught : 

Ix the Wood Shop : — Bench work in carpentery and joinery ; wood turn- 
ing, pattern making, and handling of wood- working machinery. 

Ix the Machine Shop: — Vise work with chisel and file, centering, cut- 
tin? off, drillpress, shaper, planer and lathe-work, also hand turning. 

In the Foundry : — Moulding, melting and core making. 

In the Smith Shop : — Forging, hardening and tempering, and annealing. 
To these may be added :— Millwrighting and boilermaking, the shop system 



60 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



of taking care of small tools, running engines, tiring, and care of boilers. 
There are now in preparation also courses in plumbing, and gas and steam 
fitting. 

The Shops and Equipment aki: as follows: — The carpenter and pat- 
tern shop is a two story building 30 feet by 50 feet with a wing 24 feet by 32 
feet containing the Corliss engine, condenser and air pump, feedpumps, etc. 

The lower floor is used for the wood working machines, the second story for 
tool room and benches at which carpentering is taught. 

The equipment consists of seven wood-turning lathes, one pony planer, 
one mortising machine, one Fay rip and cross-cut circular saw, one jig saw, 
one 3-foot grind stone, twelve sets of small tools in the tool room, also seventy- 
five tool lockers. 

The Foundry — Is located in the basement below the West wing of the 
Machine Shop. It is 28 feet by 61 feet long and contains accomodations for 
eight students. These consist of moulding tubs, core benches, melting fur- 
nace, core oven, spill trough, crucibles, flasks, etc. 

Here the student is required to make green and dried sand moulds from 
patterns designed to bring out the most general principles of brass and iron 
casting. 

Loam moulding is also explained; some work at the moulds while others- 
are making and drying cores and melting brass. 

The Machine and Forge Shop — Occupies the entire lower floor of 
Engineering Hall and is 28 feet wide by 61 feet long with a wing 28 feet wide 
by 40 feet long, the latter containing a tool room 10 feet by 28 feet. 

Machine tools and general equipment comprise : One 20-inch Fitchb"rg 
engine lathe, two 16-inch Reed engine lathes, one 16-inch Washburn engine 
lathe, one 10-inch Prentice Bros, engine lathe, one 9-inch Brown and Sharp 
universal hand lathe, one 9-inch Washburn engine lathe, one 20-inch 
Fitchburg drill press, one 22 by 60-inch iron planer, one 7-inch shaper. one 
Brown and Sharp emery tool grinder, one cutting-off machine, one Spiing- 
iield (Hue and Emery Wheel Co.'s 3 by 20-inch emery wheel for tool-grinding, 
one 4 by 17-inch buffing wheel, twelve machinists' vises, 73>£-feet of vise 
benches, one 38 by 51 -inch Buffalo forge, one complete set of blacksmith 
tools, one wrought-iron anvil. 

The tool room contains thirty-nine tool lockers and five cases of small tools, 
which arc sufficient to meet present wants. 

The Shops, and system of instruction there given, are under the care of an 
efficient shop foreman, assisted by two young men regularly employed to look 
after the tool room ami power plant. 

Free HAND DRAWING. The instruction in tree hand and mechanical 
drawing is under one control. For the students of the general Course, 
lice hand drawing is taughl lor one two-hour exercise each week through 
the whole Freshman year. In the first term this consists of elementary 
practice iii use oi pci,<ii, followed by drawing plane figures, conventional 
designs, and outline sketches of objects. During the second term, linear 



AGliKTI.TIUi: AND MECHANIC ARTS. 61 



perspective is carefully explained, a text- book being used witli scale and rale. 
This is later followed by exercises in free hand perspective, with elementary 
work in shades and shadows. 

For those especially proficient, some time may be found during the year for 
elementary model drawing. 

The Engineers devote the same time to free hand drawing as the other stud- 
ents, but the work is slightly modified, better to adapt it to mechanical train- 
ing. In the first term, the objects chosen for out-line drawing are usually some 
piece or cross section of a machine. They study perspective in the second 
term with the addition of isometric drawing, while somewhat less time is 
devoted to free hand perspective. Here again the objects drawn are usually 
engineering constructions of some kind. 

Mechanical Drawing and Machine Design. — This is begun in the 
first term Freshman year and continues through the whole course. Careful 
pencil work is first taught, the figures chosen being such as are involved in 
later mechanical and graphical constructions. This work is finished wilh fine 
ink lines, and shadow lines are employed where needed. Next comes a study 
of simple alphabets, followed by neat execution in tracing suitable and care- 
fully made machine drawings. 

A set of notes giving the principles of machine drawing, the best methods 
employed in engineering practice, and the theory of projections, is studied 
next, and with this, drawing from sketches of machine parts made by the 
student himself with all needed measurements, each sketch to be complete 
for use before he is permitted to begin the mechanical drawing. In this work, 
which is carried through the Freshman year, Prof. C. W. MacCord's "First 
Lessons" and "Practical Hints to Draughtsmen," are used as text-books or for 
reference. 

The drawing of the Sophomore year consists in making complete plates of 
elementary machine parts from the tables and formulas, both theoretical and 
empirical, usually adopted in engineering practice. 

Prof. Klein's book on Machine Design is used through the whole year. The 
required time devoted to this in the first term is limited to one weekly exercise 
of three hours, considerable of the student's time being used in making the 
plates of his descriptive geometry. Two three-hour sessions come in the 
second term. 

The Juniors have machine drawing and design for two afternoons through- 
out the year. Link work, valve gear and cam construction is taken up and 
some time is devoted to the drawings which accompany the study of the steam 
engine with which this year begins. When time admits problems are given in 
designing ingenious mechanisms, often serving as practice in their study of 
graphics of mechanisms. 

In the Senior year, machine design and drawing fill the same time as in the 
preceding year. The work consists, first, of the design by the different mem- 
bers, of the parts of the steam engine or such other complete machine as may 
seem best suited to the requirements or ability of the class, and later, of some- 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



design made by each member as a special study, or in cases when the gradu- 
ating thesis requires an extra amount of work of this character, such drawing 
mas occasionally be assigned to part of the regular hours for drawing. 

In all the drawing, students provide themselves with paper, instruments 
and all necessary equipments, including the drawing boards used in free 
hand work. 

A list of the instruments needed is given each member at entrance, and can 
if desired be supplied to the students at the very lowest rates. 

Km.i\kkkin<. Laboratory Work. — Besides some simple power measure- 
ments made early in the course, and the opportunity to see tests of materials 
ami experiments illustrative of principles as they are taught, a special set of 
experimental tests is made by the Seniors in their second term. This work 
occupies the day given to shop practice in the previous term. As far as pos- 
sible the arrangements for these tests are made by the students themselves 
from general plans furnished, this being considered a valuable experience. 

Thej art' taught to standardize the instruments and to allow for such 
extraordinary conditions arising to modify the usual methods as are dis- 
covered bj a careful examination previous to the test. 

The importance of having means of checking all results and of making and 
recording observations with systematic regularity and care is especially in- 

sistnl on. 

Whenever practicable, results are figured out, at least approximately, on the 
day Hi- tesi i- made, attention being called to the need for special care in ob- 
serving and computing where slight errors would greatly affect the final result, 
and to the uselessness of carrying exactness of calculation beyond the limits of 
accuracy Of ••one-ponding data. 

The equipment for this work is being constantly increased with a view to 
more varied and extended experimental tests. Provision is already made for 
tin- following : 

A boiler tesi including gas analysis and observation of quality of steam 
i>.\ steam iel and calorimeter methods. 

\n engine tesi including dynamometer and indicator power measurements 
with e8tlmateof quality and weighl of >team used. 

Efflcienc} and duty of injectors, 
ciencj and dutj of steam pumps, 
iencj oi mechanical power pumps. 

Ultimate tensile, compressive and bending strength of wrought iron, cast 
N-ei. wood, etc. 

-ill Oi elasticity of the s;inic. 

i ngth "t welded ami riveted joints. 

/tli of bolts, nuts and rivets. 

1 , "' apparatus fOl this purpose is as follows: One 35 II. P. horizontal 

1 boiler; one 55 n. P. Harris-Corliss engine; one 5 II. P. plane slide 

one Pronj brake dynamometer; one No. 9 Sturtevant fan 

1 powei absorber); one transmission dynamometer; one 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 63; 



H. P. Wheeler's patent surface condenser; one Elake air pump for 
Above: one 2 Inch Worthington water meter ; one Elliot gas analysis appa- 
ratus: one standard pyrometer; one mercury fine thermometer; two 
Thomson steam engine indicators; one Richards steam engine indicator; 
tour standard thermometers for steam and water; one Dodge injector and 
Hancock inspirator, fitted for tests; one American Steam Gauge Co.'s engine 
register; cue Scbaeffer and Eudenberg's tachometer ; one 50,000 pound- 
testing machine. Also scales, steam and power pumps for tests. 

Arrangements can also be made for tests of the 35 H. P. Buckeye engine 
running the Edison electric light station furnishing light to the College, the- 
dynamo machines being also available for certain tests. 

It >hould here be staged that liberal provisions is being made by the Board 
of Trustees for the needs of this Department. During the past year the 
Worthington Company donated their 2 inch water meter to the Depaitment 
especially for this test work, and Mr. F. M. Wheeler, of New York, donated 
his compound tubular surface condenser valued at $375.00 and furnished 
the Blake air pump, which goes with it, at a very liberal discount. 

Too great value cannot be placed on the experimental laboratory work as 
a means of fixing true conceptions of engineering principles, of training in 
scientific observation and equipping the student for actual engineering 
practice. 

It is purposed to enlarge and perfect this work as rapidly as the liberality 
of State appropriation and the friends of education make it possible. 

In this and all work of the course concentration and t lie roughness is to be 
sought before great range of subjects, and unity of effort by making every 
part of the instruction given, illustrate and reinforce every other. 

\s far as possible the attempt is made to find desirable employment for 
graduates, and success in this respect has been all that could be wished. On 
the other hand graduates can greatly aid the progress of the work of the De- 
partment by maintaining communication with and interest in the College after 
graduation. 

C. W. Sckibneb, Professor. 



64 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



THE COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



This course is similar to that in mechanical engineering, and also, though 
in a less degree, to the science course, as will be noticed upon examination of 
the several courses of study. 

The Freshman year and the first term of the Sophomore year are devoted 
mainly to preliminary studies including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, 
land surveying, drawing, descriptive geometry, and language. In the second 
term. Sophomore year, the principal studies are analytical geometry, descrip- 
tive geometry, railroad surveying, (with field practice) and physics. In con- 
nection with the class work in descriptive geometry a series of drawing prob- 
lems comprising some twenty plates, is prepared by each student. 

In the first term, Junior year, students have calculus and a continuation of 
descriptive geometry. As in the previous term, the preparation of drawings 
and practice in the field constitute a leading feature of the work. 

In the second term, Junior year, students have analytical mechanics, and 
the survey and a location of a short line of railroad, including the complete 
mapping of the same. 

During the Senior year the study of bridges forms an important feature of 
the work. A bridge, including working drawings of all details, is designed 
during the second term by each student. Such other subjects as retaining 
walls, specifications and contracts, sanitary engineering, etc., are also studied 
during this year. 

In all studies taught, it is the object to give practical as well as theoretical 
knowledge, and for this purpose a large amount of draughting and field work 
Is required of each student. The department is well supplied with field in- 
struments, drawings, blue prints models, draughting tables, etc., many of 
which are the work of its own students. 

C. F. Mount, Professor. 



AOBWULTUBE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 65 



THE COURSE IN VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

i \ THREE YEARS' COURSE. I 



It is the purpose of this Course or Department to train students for practice 
in veterinary medicine. The anatomy of the horse is the special subject of 
study, but important structural differences of other domestic animals are 
carefully noted. The lectures on anatomy are illustrated by means of plates, 
models, skeletons and prepared specimens of the organs. A convenient and 
well-furnished dissecting room affords the students every facility far anatom- 
ical work. 

Zoology. — In the second term of the Freshman and first term of the Junior 
year there are two recitations per week in zoology dealing mainly with verte- 
brates. During this time the student spends one afternoon each week in the 
laboratory in the dissection of typical forms. 

A n atomy is taught during four terms as seen by the schedule of studies 
for the Veterinary Course. 

Bistology and Physiology. — This embraces systematic histology, which 
is taught by lectures throughout the first term of the Freshman year, and 
practical histology, including the microscopic study of the tissues of the ani- 
mal body. The various methods of preparing tissues for microscopic exami- 
nation are taught with the object of familiarizing the eye of the student 
with the minute anatomy of the tissues of the animal body. 

Physiology is taught in the first term of the Junior year by lectures, reci- 
tations and demonstrations. Physiology is carried along with microscopical 
anatomy. Laboratory facilities are offered to students who desire to engage in 
original work. 

Pathology. -Pathological specimens of all kinds are brought before the 
class for the purpose of familiarizing the student with the appearance of dis- 
eased tissues. The relations of pathological histology to the principles of 
medicine and surgery are carefully studied, and the advances made in the 
application of the micro-cope to exact pathology fully considered. The use 
of the microscope in the study of pathological specimens forms an important 
part of the laboratory work during the last term of the Senior year. 

Botany. — In the second term of his Freshman year the student acquaints 
himself with general botany, and gives some attention to the identification of 
plants. In the spring term of his Junior year the student takes up Pharma- 
ceutical botany and makes a collection of fifty species named and mounted. 
In the first term of the Senior year Bacteriology and the methods of culti- 
vating bacteria and means of preventing contagious diseases. 



66 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



Chemistry. — The elementary chemistry is the same as that given in the 
first term of the Sophomore year of the Course in Science and Agriculture. 
In the Senior year the work includes the detection of poison ; analysis of 
urine from healthy and diseased animals ; examinations of food, and of 
water ; qualitive and quantitative analysis of the secretions in, and excretions 
from, the body, together with such work as the clinical department may re- 
quire. Students also compound or make medicines required by the depart- 
ment. During the second term original work is required. 

Therapeutics. — The physiological action and therapeutical value of med- 
icines used in veterinary practice are carefully considered throughout the 
Senior year. 

Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. — These subjects embrace theoreti- 
cal and practical instruction in the treatment of diseases to which all domes- 
tic animals are subject, as well as the theory and piactice of surgery. Mem- 
bers of the Senior class are made familiar with the uses of instruments and 
the administration of medicines. 

Clinics. — One hour each day is devoted to clinics. The Seniors are re- 
quired to examine animals for certificates of soundness, diagnose diseases 
and prescribe for the same. 

This Department is really a College of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. 
and has the fullest equipments for thorough instruction and practice. The 
course of study leads to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. (I). 
V. M.) 

A Three Years Course. — Lt will be noticed that beginning with 1888 the 
Veterinary course was made a three years course. This was chiefly to make 
the course technically more complete, but partly also to give time for special 
drill in general science, and in the use of the English language for those who 
from early disadvantages may be deficient therein. 

M. Stalker, Professor. 



AORKIl.ll III-: AND MECHANIC ARTS. 67 



THE LIBRARY. 



The library numbers about eight thousand volumes. These have been 
selected with reference to the wants of the departments, the aim being to 
build up a working library, which shall furnish the students, who are pursu- 
ing investigations beyond the ordinary text-books, with the best authorities 
and works of reference. It is not the intention of the College to furnish in 
its library a means of amusement, and while its officers hope to see the stu- 
dents use the books freely, they expect that such use shall be in all cases 
with a definite object in view. As the student's stay in college is short, and 
his time consequently of the greatest value, he cannot afford to waste it in the 
desultory reading even of good books. It is therefore urged upon students 
that they lay out for themselves courses of reading and study in the library, 
under the advice of the Librarian, or of some of the Professors. It is urged 
further that students make frequent use of the books of reference recom- 
mended by the teachers of the various college studies. The library is open 
from 10 a. m. to 12 m., from :l p. m. to 5 p m., and from 7 p. m. to 9 :45 p. m. 

Miss ('oka Mainland, Librarian. 



GENERAL AND SPECIAL REMARKS. 



SPECIAL LINES OF STUDY. 

Any person of mature age and good moral character, who desires to pursue 
studies in any department of instruction of the college, and who is not a can- 
didate for a degree, will, upon application to the President, be admitted on 
the following conditions : (1.) He must meet the requirements for admis- 
sion to the Freshman class and pass such special examinations as the Profes- 
sor in charge of the department selected shall deem essential to a profitable 
pursuit of the work. (2.) He shall confine his work strictly to the line of 
Study chosen at the time of admission, and shall take enough of class work 
and of laboratory and other practice to be equivalent to the amount of work 
required of the regularly classified student. (3.) He shall submit to the 
same requirements in daily recitations and in examinations, with students in 
the regular courses. Such students will be permitted to room and board in 
the dormitories of the college if t tie regularly classified students do not oc- 
cupy all of the rooms. 



68 IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



Students who have successfully pursued thus a special line of study in the 
Institution, but not such as to entitle them to graduation, will, upon applica- 
tion to the Faculty, be granted the College Certificate showing their standing 
in such studies. 

HIGHER DEGREES. 

Such degrees are conferred upon candidates recommended by the Faculty, 
in conformity with the following rules : 

1. The degree of Master of Science (M. Sc.) is open to Bachelors of 
Science who are graduates of the Course in Science and Agriculture, and of 
the Ladies' Course of this College. 

2. The degree of Mechanical Engineer (M. E.) is open to Bachelors of 
Mechanical Engineering, and to Bachelors of Science before 1878, who are 
graduates of the Mechanical Engineering Course of this College. 

3. The degree of Civil Engineer (C. E.) is open to Bachelors of Civil En- 
gineering, and to Bachelors of Science before 1878, who are graduates of the 
Civil Engineering Course of this College. 

4. The degree of Master of Philosophy (M. Ph.) is open to graduates 
of any of the four-year courses of study in this College. 

I he Faculty will recommend for the above degrees candidates otherwise 
qualified who, after taking their Bachelor's degree, shall pursue a two years 
course of study embracing at least two subjects selected with the approval of 
the Faculty from the list of post-graduate studies, and shall, during that time, 
reside at the College for at least one year; and shall pass a thorough exami- 
nation upon that course, showing in one of the subjects special attainments. 
and shall present a satisfactory thesis. 

Kach resident graduate must apply in writing for examination at least six 
weeks before the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, stating explicitly 
the subject in which he desires to be examined, and, at the time of exami- 
nation, (which may be four weeks before the meeting of the Board,) he must 
present to the Faculty his final thesis. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDIES. 

Instruction and opportunities for advanced study are given in the following 
branches to post-graduate students, provided that undergraduate work shall 
not <|iialif'j a student for a post-graduate degree : 

l. Psychology. 2. The Philosophy of Science. 3. Social Science. 4. 
English and American Literature. 5. The Science of Language, o. Phys- 
iological Botany. 7. Systematic Botany. 8. Zoology and Entomology. '•>. 
Original Designs of Engineering Structures. LO. Veterinary Pathology and 
Materia Medica. ii. The Principles of Heredity. 12. Applied Mechanics 
Agricultural and Organic Chemistry, i i. Physics. L5. Analytical 
a lometrj ami Calculus. L6. Horticulture and Forestry. IT. Agriculture. 
French Gaf man and Latin. L9. History, advanced. 20. Ethics. 



AGlUCri/rriiE AND MECHANIC ARTS. 69 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

Examinations for promotion from each college class to tbe next higher in 
the course occur only during the last full weeK of the Fall term and the first 
week of the Spring term each year. Students who teach school during the 
winter will be expected so to arrange the time of beginning and of closing 
their schools as to be present at one of these regular examinations. Students 
who do not teach will of course be expected to be present. Sickness and 
actual inability will be held to be the only valid excuses for absence. Special 
or private examinations cannot be held to suit the convenience of students. 
To hold them thus would be a damage to all the classes and an injustice to 
the Faculty. The same general regulations hold good in regard to the exam- 
inations at the close of the Spring term in June and at the beginning of the 
Fall term in July. The success of the College, and of each student in it, de- 
pends upon the rigid enforcement of the above regulations. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF 



INDEX 



PAGES. 

Academies, List of for Entrance Ceitificates, - - 27 
Admission, Requirements for, __...'. 26-27 

Agriculture, Course in Science and 32, 37. 45 

Algebra, ----- _ _ 37 

Anatomy, - - - - 44 

Analytical Geometry, - 38 
Apparatus, - 43, 44, 46, 47, 55, 60, 62, 64, etc. 

Astronomy, ^- - - - - 40 

Biology, - - - - 45 

Board of Trustees. Meetings, Com., etc., - - - 6-7 

Board (Table) Cost of, per week, - - - 28 

Botany, - - 42 

Buildings, College, - - - 23-25 

Calculus. _-.-- 38 

Calendar, College, - - - - 4-5 

Card of Inquiry, - - - 27 

Certificate of Standing, College. - - - 68 

Chemistry. - - 40-41 

Civilizai ion, History of - 52 

Classification of Students, - - 27 

Clinics, - .... . 66 

Commercial Law, - 40 

Courses of Study, Tabular Exhibit of 32-36 

Courses of Study, General Remarks on - - 32-37,69 

Creamery, College, - - 40 

Degrees in the College Courses, - - 30-31 

Degrees, Higher or Post-Graduate, - - 68 

Directions to Candidates and Students, 26-27 

Domestic Economy, Course in - 54 

Elocution, - - 50 

English Composition, 4t> 

English Literature, - 51 

Equipments, Buildings, • •)<■.. - 23 25 

Ethics, - 48-40 

Examinations, • 28-69 

Experiment station. Building. - 25 

Expenses, Necessary, of Students, 28 29 



AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC A ins. 



71 



Experiment station. Officers of 

Faculty of the College, 

French, - 

Geology, - ... 

Geometry, and Analytical Geometry, 

German, - 

Government, 

Graduates, Resident, List of 

Grounds, College, 

High Schools, List of for Entrance Certificates, 

Histology, -..-- 

Historical Sketch of Origin of College, 

History, General, - 

History of Civilization, - 

Honor List. - 

Horticulture and Foresty, 

Labor, Instructive and Uninstructive. 

Laboratory and Shop Practice, - 

Ladies' Course of Study, - 

Language and Literature, 

Latin. Objects Sought in its Study, - 

Library. College, - - 

Location of College, 

Manual Training, Shop Practice, etc., 

Mathematics, - 

Mechanical Engineering, Courses in - 

Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary, 

Meetings of Board of Trustees, 

Military Science and Tactics, 

Moral Science, - 

Music, Vocal and Instrumental, 

Officers of the Board of Trustees, - 

Officers of Instruction, 

Pathology, 

Philosophy, ----- - 

Physics, 

Physiology, 

Political Economy, 

Post-Graduate Studies, 

Psychology, ... - 

Public Worship. - 

Recpuirements for Admission, 

Resident Graduates, 

Rhetoric, - 



PAGES. 

11 
9-10 

- 51-52 
43-44 

38 
52 
30 
12 

- 23-25 

- 26 
65 

21-23 

52 

52 

19 

47-48 

- 29-30 

29-30 

33 and 54 

49-52 

51 

67 

23 

29-30 

37-38 

34 and 56-63 

65-66 

6 

- 53 
48-49 
55-56 

6 

9-10 

65 

48-49 

38-40 

44 and 6o 

49 

68 

48 

30 

26-29 

12 

49 



72 IOWA STATE COLLEGE. 



Shop Practice and Laboratory Work, 

Special Remarks and Notices, - 

Special Studies or Lines of Study, 

Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees, 

Students, List or Catalogue of 

Summary of Students in Attendance, - 

Surveying, - 

Tactics, Military, - 

Therapeutics, - 

Theses, Graduation, - 

Theses, Post-Graduate, 

Trigonometry, Plane, - 

Trustees, Meetings, Officers, etc., 

Veterinary Science, Course in 

Welch, Dr. A. S., Memorial Page, 

Worship, Public, - 

Zoology, ... - 



PAGES. 


- 29-30 


67-69 


- 37, 67 


7 


12-20 


20 


- 38 


53 


66 


31 


- 68 


38 


- 6-7 


36, 65-66 


8 


30 


- 65 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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